Audio Technica advice request

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On the topic of cartridge loading.

The typical capacitances are as follows:

1. Arm tube wiring capacitance ( 30 pF ? )
2. Connector capacitance ( 10 pF ? )
3. External cable capacitance ( 120 pF per meter ?)
4. preamp input capacitance ( varies .... 47pF min ? )

So we might get up to about 200pF very easily .
Is this correct ?
Looks like the ones that are controllable are 3 and 4.
We could probably find some 60pF per meter cables and manipulate the preamp input cap.
 
Actually a cartridge manufacturer suggests a load for their cartridge,that totals all you have mentioned.In the end,it is the ear that will decide if you will use more,or less capacitance,depending on what you hear from the system.If it is something that can be controlled by the capacitance,then you are lucky!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Usually,amplifiers have around 100pf at their input.
 
The resistance load also matters. Lowering it can soften the sound.
I have just got a 440MLa . It does sound a bit bright. I should reduce the resistance and try. Increasing the cap will decrease the resonant frequency.
Since most modern cartridges seem to work better with a lower capacitance load than older cartridges, maybe the basic input cap of all preamps should be lowered with the option of increasing it in 50 ( or 47 ) pF steps. Mine starts at 47pF.
 
Hi,

ART cables (American Recorder Technology), use Mogami cable and have 17 pF per foot. They are cheap at KABUSA.com.

Belden 89259 also has similar specs in case you need to lower the total pF between your headshell and the Phono Stage or Preamp in.

I have an old NAD 1020 which has a very decent Phono Stage for an old, cheap Preamp. It has an nice setup. At the Phono input, it gives three choices, 100pF, 220pF and 320pF. That would be nice if they were all like that. But people like us wouldn't be happy and we would change it anyway! LOL

Sy, if you go for it, can you tell us your results and any tweaks you try? Thanks!

Regards//Keith
 
I probably will go for it, but I'm going to have to think through what I do for an RIAA stage. My current one is set up for balanced low output MC. I'm very happy with balanced connection between the TT and the phono stage, but for an MM the setup will have to be a lot more complicated unless I go back to unbalanced.
 
I use the AT150-MLX after using the AT-ML150 for many years. I believe these are the best MM cartridges available - they pretty much smoke the Shure V15. The AT150Ti may still be available as a slightly cheaper alternative. It is the same cartridge except that the coating on the boron cantilever is titanium instead of gold. Before anyone starts in on audiophool ridicule, the gold plating is to provide corrosion protection as well as some damping. The titanium serves the same purpose with presumably less mass. Some people ascribe a "bright" tonal quality to these cartridges, citing a +2dB frequency rise above 10khz. But a lot of cartridges sound bright before they are broken in and besides, anyone who has looked carefully at Fletcher-Munson contours should know that this frequency rise is insignificant and brightness really occurs in the upper midrange. I think this cartridge sounds fantastic when broken in and represents the best value out there.

John
 
SY said:
I probably will go for it, but I'm going to have to think through what I do for an RIAA stage. My current one is set up for balanced low output MC. I'm very happy with balanced connection between the TT and the phono stage, but for an MM the setup will have to be a lot more complicated unless I go back to unbalanced.

I suggest you look at the AT33PTG. It's low output, a superb tracker and one hell of a MC for the price. You have to order from Japan. Audiocubes2 sells it, or you can get it on Ebay for slightly less (and not much more than the 150MLX).
 
Some people ascribe a "bright" tonal quality to these cartridges, citing a +2dB frequency rise above 10khz.

You can always get rid of this by using the correct termination capacitance. For the 150MLX I think 150pF are correct and usually achieved already by the phono cable itself. So most 150MLX have to work with too high capacitance and produce therefore this phenomenon. It's just improper setup.

All the best, Hannes
 

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You never get rid of brightness using capacitance without drawbacks.There are too often cases where capacitance "tames"some brightness on paper,but in the real listening world things sound compressed, aggressive and harsher.You might prefer the "original" brightness eventually.So,careful with those caps.
 
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