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Electrostatic design - is a round design practical?
Electrostatic design - is a round design practical?
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Old 27th May 2004, 06:55 PM   #21
Alidore is offline Alidore
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Default Put a hex on 'em

Hello Sashua,

Thanks for the clarifying posts - I see now that you've already got the tweeter end of things well under control.

I believe that multiple small conventional woofers is the way to go.

The comb filtering you see in a same-plane driver array is largely eliminated if you use a splayed array. This from Earl Geddes' "Audio Transducers". Very uniform results are obtained from splaying two drivers out by 30 degrees to either side of the centerline, or in other words with an angle of 60 degrees between the drivers.

This happens to work out very nicely - if you like hexagons. The angle between each face of a hexagon is 60 degrees. You could build a columnar hexagonal enclosure and mount a small woofer on each vertical face.

Now because of the way the drivers' responses will sum (remember that each driver's radiation pattern is widening as you go down in frequency), you want to use drivers that have a smoothly and gently tipped-up response across their passband. Morel's smaller Neodymium drivers come to mind. They have very low power compression and very good low-level articulation, which you want if you'll be using an ionic tweeter. The physically compact frame and magnet assemblies of the Morels makes a fairly compact hexagon possible.

A hexagonal ring of small woofers will be smoothly omnidirectional in the horizontal plane. You will still get some beaming in the vertical plane, but probably not enough to be of consequence with a 1 kHz ballpark crossover.
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Old 27th May 2004, 10:30 PM   #22
454Casull is offline 454Casull  Canada
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Quote:
Originally posted by Hybrid fourdoor
Do a search on Plasma Tweeters. They are probably the truest iteration of what you are thinking about.

However they have drawbacks, such as frequency extension, very high voltage, very little resources available, and they produce ozone.


But they basically use a plasma flame that modulates at the frequency...in <practically> true 360* nature.
http://www.studioerosbarone.it/diego/Plasma2eng.htm
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Old 27th May 2004, 11:07 PM   #23
Cal Weldon is offline Cal Weldon  Canada
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Electrostatic design - is a round design practical?
Pulsating spheres?

Didn't someone start a thread called "Frogs, the ultimate midrange?" a while back? There might be something to it.

Let's go ask Dr Dolittle.

Cal
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Old 28th May 2004, 02:08 PM   #24
sashua is offline sashua  United States
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454casull,
Thanks very much for the link to that highly informative webpage. All my internet searching never unearthed that little gem.

Russ
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Old 28th May 2004, 02:57 PM   #25
Sheldon is offline Sheldon  United States
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Default Ultrasonics

Ok. You said you wanted something outside of the box. I don't know how DIY this is, but there is a company in San Diego that has been developing systems based on ultrasonic sound generators. As I understand it, the ultrasonic waves are aimed at a point from two radiators. The sound is generated where the ultrasonic waves interfere. So-- figure out how to aim waves from multiple sources, so that the iterference zone is essentially spherical. No box at all!

Sheldon

http://www.atcsd.com/
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Old 28th May 2004, 03:15 PM   #26
sashua is offline sashua  United States
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Fascinating - Ultrasonic emmiters placed around a room. Sounds more like sci-fi than hi-fi!

I wonder if the result bears any relation to music? Pretty cool idea anyway though!

Russ
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Old 10th October 2004, 11:23 AM   #27
Hans Zeeuwe is offline Hans Zeeuwe  Netherlands
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Quote:
Originally posted by sreten


For omni directional you will have to enclose the backwave.

As far as I know for electrostatics this simply doesn't work.

sreten.
There is an electrostatic loudspeaker that encloses the back wave, namely the Beveridge ESL's. You can find more about them on The Audio Circuit, in the Electrostatic Loudspeakers section
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Old 10th October 2004, 11:31 AM   #28
Hans Zeeuwe is offline Hans Zeeuwe  Netherlands
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Default O

Cosmostatic built an omnidirectional electrostatic loudspeaker called the Omnidirctional. More information on the Cosmostatics can be found at The Audio Circuit
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Old 6th May 2005, 06:21 PM   #29
el`Ol is offline el`Ol  Germany
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Default Mangers in a spherical enclosure

A friend of mine has Mangers built into spherical enclosures at opposing poles. When you walk around them there is no "break" whatever in the sound. In the current version the speakers are dipoles but he used an unipolar setting earlier. I didn`t listen to that, but it should do the job.
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Old 6th May 2005, 06:42 PM   #30
sashua is offline sashua  United States
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You say that there is no break in the sound but even if the Manger driver had a perfect 180 degree dispersion pattern there would still be a seam in the transition and/or overlap with drivers placed on opposing ends of a sphere. You must also consider the vertical dispersion of sound. Get above or underneath the speaker and there will be a frequency rolloff for sure.

Good idea, probably sounds great....but it still doesn't make the grade for a "perfect" omni design.

Russ
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