Go Back   Home > Forums > >
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Blogs Gallery Wiki Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Why aren't we building horns this way?
Why aren't we building horns this way?
Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 28th December 2015, 09:55 PM   #1
peteleoni is offline peteleoni  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Default Why aren't we building horns this way?

https://www.google.com/search?ie=UTF...iner+over+foam
(Third video down)
Bear with this guy till he stands on it, then I believe you will see the light.
Foam comes in sheets like plywood at Lowes etc.

. I had this idea for horn construction a few weeks ago and found this online today. IMO this makes everything much easier and it is waaaaaay inexpensive. I realize this may be moved to construction section but I believe it is important enough to stay here for a while as just about all of us are going to be making or buying Synergy horns sooner or later. In the aviation community we have been making airplanes something like this a long time, (albeit with a bit harder skin as your butt is in danger as opposed to a bad ear day) (-;

This is ideal for horns and perhaps could possibly be rendered non resonant enough for even enclosures in general especially small ones. There is a multitude of foam sheeting available at Lowe's etc. and trust me when I tell you as a Mississippian that pickup bed liner is STRONG and can cover rust holes up to a half an inch in diameter. Above is this fellows (very amusing) clip. Reminds me of "watch this sh** honey!" but ends well. (-:
__________________
I am The Audio Infidel..... I don't even tolerate my own BS.

Last edited by peteleoni; 29th December 2015 at 04:48 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th December 2015, 02:40 AM   #2
peteleoni is offline peteleoni  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Really? No one sees the possibilities here?
__________________
I am The Audio Infidel..... I don't even tolerate my own BS.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th December 2015, 03:08 AM   #3
Skip Pack is offline Skip Pack  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Northern California
I followed your link and looked at the videos, and agree that it's got some promise. I didn't see a mention of a mold release agent, but it sure looks like you could develop a mold using the process that John Inlow describes:

DIY Paper Horn - The Paper Horn by Inlow Sound

but use the polymer instead of the paper-mache. Stiffen with expanding foam on the outside and you should be good.

Skip
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th December 2015, 03:33 AM   #4
Pano is offline Pano  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
Pano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: SW Florida
Why aren't we building horns this way?
Clever, but what are the acoustic properties of the foam? AKAIK Styrofoam passed bass like a sieve. Not sure about midrange.
__________________
Take the Speaker Voltage Test!
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th December 2015, 03:58 AM   #5
Skip Pack is offline Skip Pack  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Northern California
I was thinking of the generally noxious urethane foam. If this was backing up a 400 hz or so horn it shoud be very stiff. The urethane foam might not work with the bed liner material. Worth a little research.

Skip
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th December 2015, 04:10 AM   #6
peteleoni is offline peteleoni  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Foam? Thefoam is just a core in a way. It could almost be dissolved after the liner is on, but that messes up the "stressed skin" thing we have going on. That liner is hard and thick. Really all we will be doing is vastly improving the jbl designs. Yes the famous 2380 etc are as anyone that ever dropped a speaker and broke the weaklings can tell you, just a thin plastic coat over dense foam, this is far far more rugged. Do not think of truck liner as "paint" think of it as eighth to quarter inch hard plastic. Really inert acoustically hardly rings when thumped. I think we are all working our butts off to make an inferior horn out of wood. Plus, instant prototyping and nearly pain free inexpensive revisions. it's working? Spray or brush on your horn. makes the throat adapter easy too, just bond it in and coat. Available in any color as well. You can slide refrigerators across that hard coating and it is very hard to break an eighth inch thick of dried spill piece in your hand. It expands slightly as it dries.
__________________
I am The Audio Infidel..... I don't even tolerate my own BS.

Last edited by peteleoni; 29th December 2015 at 04:29 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th December 2015, 04:16 AM   #7
peteleoni is offline peteleoni  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skip Pack View Post
I followed your link and looked at the videos, and agree that it's got some promise. I didn't see a mention of a mold release agent, but it sure looks like you could develop a mold using the process that John Inlow describes:

DIY Paper Horn - The Paper Horn by Inlow Sound

but use the polymer instead of the paper-mache. Stiffen with expanding foam on the outside and you should be good.

Skip
Don't need a mold just a knife glue and a tape measure. The foam is the core, the liner is the strength. This is flat pack extraordinaire material, Would weigh next to nothing to ship.
__________________
I am The Audio Infidel..... I don't even tolerate my own BS.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th December 2015, 04:23 AM   #8
peteleoni is offline peteleoni  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Once again foam comes in 4 x 8 sheets at Lowes for $5 or so. Think it as featherweight lumber, cut it like wood but with a razor knife, then glue, put/glue the throat adapter in using spray foam, sand it to shape. Voila!
__________________
I am The Audio Infidel..... I don't even tolerate my own BS.

Last edited by peteleoni; 29th December 2015 at 04:42 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th December 2015, 04:26 AM   #9
Mindsource is offline Mindsource  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Canada
Why aren't we building horns this way?
I'm watching with interest.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th December 2015, 04:35 AM   #10
Pano is offline Pano  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
Pano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: SW Florida
Why aren't we building horns this way?
Wood is a good material for horns. But even that can be improved with double walls sand filled. That's why my worry about rhino liner over foam. If something like sand between two walls of wood can make a difference, just how good is foam going to be?

I think it's a cool idea, just cautious about the materials.
__________________
Take the Speaker Voltage Test!
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Why aren't we building horns this way?Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Building John's Paper Mache Horns ra7 Multi-Way 21 26th December 2014 03:15 AM
Building three way JMLC iwata styled horns Cort Multi-Way 7 12th April 2014 07:18 PM
Ideas for building big round horns ARIYAHOOR Multi-Way 16 24th July 2012 05:44 PM
my VOTT's aren't quite loud enough... LineArrayNut Multi-Way 3 7th May 2008 04:16 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:55 PM.


Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 15.00%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2020 diyAudio
Wiki