Front Panel Artwork Software

I want to add lettering for the names of switches and pots on the front panel of some test gear I've built. I thought I could use my computer to do the lettering, but there doesn't seem to be an easy program to use.
Autocad is way over the top to write "ON" and "OFF" in the right place, Windows Paint and Paint Shop Pro don't have the co-ordinate system to place the text in relation to the controls. Turbocad is difficult to learn and probably over the top in complexity.
It's a simple thing that I want, to draw an outline of the front panel, and write "ON" and "OFF in the right place. I spent two hours with Turbocad today and got nowhere.:xeye:
How would you do it?
What programs do you use?
 
Times have changed and there is no need to keep your elaborate electronic project in an old cigar packet any longer.Today specialised dealers offer cases for almost all electronic applications you may think of. But still self-made devices often look quite incomplete, because of a missing front panel design. Use FrontDesigner to design good-looking front panels for your self-made devices and take advantage of the following features:

exactly fitting coloured and b/w symbols and labels
predefined and user-editable library
a scale-assistant creates scales for switches, potentiometers and instruments
measurement options simplify drilling
a mirrored printout to transparent film gives a long-life panel design
and many more ...

http://www.abacom-online.de/UK/html/frontdesigner.html
 
I understand why you think that AutoCAD is over the top. I love it however, and use it for everything that I can. I have a friend, Theatrical Technical Director, that actually makes all his calendars and work lists in AutoCAD because it gives him infinite control over placement of items and scaling.

Milo
 

pinkmouse

diyAudio Moderator Emeritus
2002-04-03 7:15 pm
Rotherham, England
A3rd.Zero said:
I understand why you think that AutoCAD is over the top. I love it however, and use it for everything that I can. I have a friend, Theatrical Technical Director, that actually makes all his calendars and work lists in AutoCAD because it gives him infinite control over placement of items and scaling.

Milo

I know a guy who uses powerpoint for everything he does, for much the same reasons I suspect, he simply knows the package inside out.
 
johnnyx said:
.........
How would you do it?
What programs do you use?


These frontpanels are made by Schaeffer, Berlin.
You download the program and send the file and recieve the frontpanels - nice work



Shaeffer - Berlin
 

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nd grossly expensive ... around here Architects buy Vectorworks (which is a better & more capable program anyway) and the money they save vrs an AutoCad seat is enuff to pay for the workstation to put the CAD software on.

dave

Oh no you didnt! Vectorworks! VECTORWORKS! you have got to be kidding me!

Actually AutoCAD is only grossly expensive in its 3d variant. The 2d version is only around $600. The 3d software however is absolutely, no question, the most flexible and spectacular 3d CAD rendering software out there IMHO. I have used Vectorworks and it defiantly has its place but it certainly lacks in the flexibility. For simple drawings Vectorworks is superior but as soon as things get even the smallest bit complex it starts to loose it luster. I know Lighting designers who swear by Vectorworks because of its ease of use but I dont know anyone who creates technical drawings (not pretty picture drawings) that use it. Not that those people use AutoCAD either but Vectorworks? No.

Sorry this was a ranting not meant to be a flame. I totally respect others choices of software I just happen to think that AutoCAD is the best piece of software ever (which I know is silly but the fact remains).

:D (smiley just to show that Im not really a jerk, despite what the former may lead you to think)

Milo
 
Re: Re: Front Panel Artwork Software

medum said:



These frontpanels are made by Schaeffer, Berlin.

They look very good, very professional. worth doing when I have a design that I want to keep as a permanent piece of equipment.

All my stuff so far has been of the "experimental/prototype" variety, I have some stick - on material suitable for laser printers that I intend to use. I tried the Front Designer program and it is very easy to use. I have a moving - coil meter that reads 0 - 20V, and I want it to read 0 - 30V; with this program it is easy to create a suitable scale. Not so when my friend tried to do it in Autocad.:( The Scheaffer cann't do this, it isn't front panel though.

Front designer is limited, perhaps, but does all that I want, and doesn't suffer from "feature bloat".

Thanks for all your help. Computers need good software, and it is difficult to find the right one; there are so many opinions.:D
 
A3rd.Zero said:
AutoCAD vrsVectorworks

My experience is only with Architects... some 70% of architects in this city use VectorWorks (on Macs). We get a lot of imports from the mainland, who only know AutoCad. Inveriably they complain at 1st... AutoCad is better. But within 6 months their attitude is, i don't know how i ever used that program -- i have not run across anyone who didn't become a convert.

dave
 
yeah, one of my best friends (lighting designer) is a convert, and he knows AutoCAD better than most people I know. However, he still uses AutoCAD exclusively for complex drawings and mechanical designs.

The one thing I can't get by, and I know its just me not the program, is that Vectorworks exists in scale and AutoCAD exists in true scale. It is just more comfortable for me to work in, especially if I am producing a drawing in different formats (E sheets, and A sheets). I also cant say enough about associated dimensions (if you change a wall thickness your dimensions move with it.)

Sorry for the thread-jacking, Ill stop now. :)

Milo
 
A3rd.Zero said:
The one thing I can't get by, and I know its just me not the program, is that Vectorworks exists in scale and AutoCAD exists in true scale. It is just more comfortable for me to work in, especially if I am producing a drawing in different formats (E sheets, and A sheets).

I find that a nice feature... every layer can be a different scale... and that scale can be changed synamically... very nice for doing details on the same sheet.

When we i worked at the plotter service place, the 1:1 scale of DWGs was sometimes a real pain.

I also cant say enough about associated dimensions (if you change a wall thickness your dimensions move with it.)

VW does that...

dave
 
A3rd.Zero said:
The 3d software however is absolutely, no question, the most flexible and spectacular 3d CAD rendering software out there IMHO

I guess you haven't seen solidworks or proEngineer at work before then?

3d CAD work...

Just thought Id put a picture in of my first cad modules coursework too :) I used to think things like autocad and turbocad ruled a while back too, but these modern bits of software blew me away a bit! so simple to use but still do all you can think of :)

PS not afilliated with proe or solidworks at all etc etc. just one very impressed student
 

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Word Art?

I tried Word, Paint, Paint Shop Pro and Turbocad before posting the question. I just couldn't work out how to draw a rectangle 202mm X 54mm, in any of them. It's the absolute dimension part that was difficult. This was the important bit in my case, it has to fit. Ive already drilled the front panel where I want switches to go, and I want the labels to go in the right place.

I'm happy now that I've got something that does what I want with no messing about.:)
 
I think turbocad has some boxes down the bottom of the screen that appear as you create rectangles and boxes etc so you can type in precise dimensions as you draw. I think you can type the corner points in the coordinates boxes down the bottom right too I think. its a few years since ive played with turbocad though so it might be different now. If youve got what you want now though thats the main thing :)
Steve
 
baggystevo82 said:


I guess you haven't seen solidworks or proEngineer at work before then?

3d CAD work...

Just thought Id put a picture in of my first cad modules coursework too :) I used to think things like autocad and turbocad ruled a while back too, but these modern bits of software blew me away a bit! so simple to use but still do all you can think of :)

PS not afilliated with proe or solidworks at all etc etc. just one very impressed student

Hummm looks like a Saito 180 twin 4 stroke.
 
Hummm looks like a Saito 180 twin 4 stroke
Yes it's very similar to modern 4-stroke model aeroplane engines, apart from the lack of valve gear cover obviously. It's only 9cc though (which I think is only around 0.6cu.in as opposed to the Saito's 1.8) It's actually a Vega V-twin probably designed a long long time ago (unsure of the designer, as I havent got the drawings with me at uni this term). This engine is designed to be machined all from solid, with no castings being used at all. So it's a pure diy engine, unless you're Laser of course, who I think are the only people not to use many castings these days for model engines. Sorry for this going so far off topic! hehe
Steve