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-   -   Faulty Connexelectronic SMPS2000R [Resolved] (http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/power-supplies/201468-faulty-connexelectronic-smps2000r-resolved.html)

Rarkov 29th November 2011 08:01 PM

Faulty Connexelectronic SMPS2000R [Resolved]
 
Hi all,
I ordered two SMPS2000R power supplies to power my Tripath TA0105A amps. One works OK but the other was dead on arrival. I have tried everything to get help from Cristi, but to no avail. I've even recorded videos of my attempts to debug the circuit and posted it on YouTube. Cristi tells me that video sites are blocked where he comes from, so I hosted the video on my site. Apparently that didn't work either...so I cut the video into 5 and emailed them, but that didn't work either...

Next was Skype - but you both have to be on at the same time for that to work...now all attempts to communicate via email have gone unanswered.

Two questions:
  1. Has anyone else had this problem with Connexelectronic?
  2. Any ideas how to debug the SMPS2000R?!

Thanks!
Gareth

norazmi 29th November 2011 08:15 PM

Good information, have u try ask him with cristi sales thread at marketplace? maybe u can get some information there, btw i dont have any idea about smps2000r, it cost more than $100 i think..

luka 29th November 2011 08:32 PM

what have you checked on it?
where are the vids?
is pretty simple circuit, switching supplys

Rarkov 29th November 2011 09:30 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Video here: Testing the Connex Electronic SMPS2000R - YouTube

This is what's happening:
  1. Checked all fuses on board with continuity meter - all fine.
  2. Connected the board to the mains (240V) using the Live, Neutral and Earth wires with 13amp fuse.
  3. Turned on power from mains and POWER LED turned on
  4. Measured +ve rail to GND: 0V
  5. Measured -ve rail to GND: 0V
  6. Measured +ve AUX to AUX GND: 0V
  7. Measured -ve AUX to AUX GND: 0V

I was asked to check pads 1, 2 and 3 from the attachment which measured as follows:
  1. 2.7V
  2. 10.56V
  3. 12.57V

Apparently, they should have measured:
  1. 12.5 - 15V
  2. 11 - 13.5V
  3. 16 - 22V

Thanks for any help!!!
Gareth

luka 29th November 2011 10:40 PM

I don't know what those are, but check if IC has power, if its oscillator is working, if it is outputting anything on its output and so on
Led could be just to indicate that main capacitors are charged... nothing important

Do you have scope?

Rarkov 29th November 2011 10:51 PM

Thanks luka,
I have a scope, but its been a good few years since I've used it! I'll have to dust off my memory! I'll check the board tomorrow and find out what the IC is and grab the datasheet.

Again, thanks for your help!
Gareth

Kv3audio 2nd December 2011 11:09 AM

I was looking to buy the 500W version of that SMPS. will I face same issues?

luka 2nd December 2011 06:36 PM

its still unknown what is wrong

! 3rd December 2011 01:19 AM

Basically you just use the multimeter to trace the circuit, the path the current flows from input to output to see where the values aren't right anymore.

There seems to be a typical line filter, then at bridge rectifier input you should still have near 240VAC, then on the output you'd have about 335V DC, then tracing over to one or more switching transistors you'd have their base driven by the control circuit, and an emitter and collector voltage levels (or mosfet gate, drain and source pins). If no voltage is coming out of the transistors and they are driven at their base still, suspect transistor fault. If there is no base drive, begin tracing the control circuit. Locate the control IC and its datasheet or make a schematic of a discrete design to better understand what to measure in it.

If on the other hand you still have a good voltage level going into the transformer, measure at the transformer output (secondary) windings too.

It helps that you have one that works ok because you can compare readings between the two. Just be careful, playing with line powered power supplies is potentially dangerous. Some would advise hooking this up with a light bulb in series on the AC input to limit current.

Kv3audio 3rd December 2011 05:57 PM

I think you should ask for a return of this power supply, if its faulty already

A schematic will help you to fix it also.


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