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Old 17th February 2010, 05:16 PM   #11
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the higher the voltage(Vgs) the better off you are. jer
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Old 17th February 2010, 05:51 PM   #12
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re:repost, the higher the voltage(Vds) the better off you are. a typical micro wave oven full wave rectified is about 3120v ,cascading 2 fets at 1700v would give you 3400v it would take 4 1000v fets to safely handle 3120v without the risk of breakdown also causing a 100% increase of parts count.when your dealing high power h.v. the more parts the more problems.not to mention cost (which can be questionable)and reliability. jer
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Old 18th February 2010, 09:25 AM   #13
bentl is offline bentl  Norway
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Hi, is there a formula that can be used to determine how much wire of a given gauge a coilformer with dimensions X*Y*Z can hold?

I have simulated this in Excel presuming that the coilformer crosssection grows by 2*wire gauge for each layer but there must be a simpler way?

regards,
Bent
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Old 18th February 2010, 02:21 PM   #14
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i have done much research on transformer design and in doing searchs online i hace found many calculators here is one that you might find useful Transformer Calculation Help File i also have several well written spreadsheets and other url's and progrms also but this one determins turns and wire size wire for a user selected core size.see if this helps you.if not i have more.also i inclued a zip of another one. jer
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File Type: zip trafo-0.9-win32.zip (730.2 KB, 152 views)
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Old 18th February 2010, 03:14 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bentl View Post
Hi, is there a formula that can be used to determine how much wire of a given gauge a coilformer with dimensions X*Y*Z can hold?

I have simulated this in Excel presuming that the coilformer crosssection grows by 2*wire gauge for each layer but there must be a simpler way?

regards,
Bent
Sure. There is so called space ratio: total wire cross area to former (core) window area.
Max recommended is 0.4. If you need some additional isolation layers ratio will suffer... Do not forget the swelling - the farther from the core the more round the turn gets.
Alex
In real life you can't make fully filled former from the first iteration, i.e. by making transformer/coil. The conservative approach lives you with some space on avail. Optimistic lives you with incompleted primary or secondary.
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Old 19th February 2010, 12:55 PM   #16
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Is there anybody out there that have tested these transformers?

You can alter the step up between 1:9 and 1:129, from 150Hz.

Hammond Mfg. - Universal Tube Output - Push-Pull Transformers - (125 Series)

And buy them here:

Das Musikding - Hammond 125E output transformer hamm125e
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Old 20th February 2010, 11:46 PM   #17
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i have not tested that one,jonas,if i had one i would certainly test it for you and post the results. however i did find a few more trnasformers laying around today to mess with,1# a toriodial somewhwere between 100 to 150 watts i'm guessing because it is in a steel sheilding case and is about the same outside dimensions as the previous one i tested, the results were roughly the same almost identical except the resonate peak was at 840khz and less ringing on a square wave which resulted in a much cleaner waveform up to 120 khz.2# an e-i tube type power transformer which failed miseribly, it looked like a bandpass filter tuned to peak of 225hz not even at the 60 hz it was designed for and would not produce a square wave. 3# e-i tube type output for push pull el-34's(6ca7) showed good square wave from 10hz to 600hz with much much more ringing at 175khz ,sine wave test was flat 10hz to 2.2hz with a consistant slope from 2.2khz to +8db at 20khz continuoisly rising onto 100khz and up.which tells me why this amp sounded harsh and trebley,yet a warm low end, when i used it for my guitar (which i liked, but not for music)this is the same transformer i used to drive my mini esl driver when i discribed what i heard (i don't remember if it was this thread or another)coming from it.all of the test made no diffirence in response by swapping the primary for the secondary or vice versa except for the loading of the signal generator level which remained constant reguardless of frequency,changing only the voltage ratio.once again a toroidial power transformer wins hands down and unmodified. jer
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Old 20th February 2010, 11:50 PM   #18
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if i do any more tests on transformers i will post them here from now on.as not too clutter up the materials thread. jer
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Old 21st February 2010, 05:28 AM   #19
bentl is offline bentl  Norway
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Hi all, ant thanks for all information sharing regarding transformers.

I am ready to (re)wind my first transformer now, and wonder how does one test a transformer?

I have the winding jigg set up, and a idea of how the transformer should be wound.


The measuting instruments I have are:

- Ears
- Measuring microphone, Behringer MC6000 with mic-amp and various software
- Oscilloscope, 1-channel PicoScope for PC
- Simple but accurate multimeter.

Regards

Bent
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Old 21st February 2010, 09:45 AM   #20
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basicly you have to have signal generator that produces a sine wave(square is optional but can tell you alot about the integraty of the transformer you are testing) and scope and/or a vom.if you have sound card and any decent amplifier can work as a signal generator,i use audacity software it is a great little package simple to use and it is free.set it up for the highest sample rate and resolution you can.i see you have pico probe listed i have never used it so i don't know the spec's.but make sure you use a resistor divider on the input of it when measuring high voltages off of your transformer so as not to blow out the input of the device.
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