resonant frequency of water (distilled) and how to make speaker play underwater - diyAudio
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Old 28th September 2005, 04:29 AM   #1
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Default resonant frequency of water (distilled) and how to make speaker play underwater

this is a very strange question...

but I'm interested in what the resonant frequency of water is...

also I'm trying to figure out a way to generate (whatever this frequency is) at as many DB as I can underwater...

hearsay this frequency is around 42khz... but I think this is hogwash and am not willing to spend the money to try it...

I would like to see 180-190db in the water at w/e frequency this is.... and have about 10,000 watts RMS to work with in achieving it

this is a serious question BTW...
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Old 28th September 2005, 04:38 AM   #2
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only thing I've found

"Far infrared (FIR) frequency happens to be the resonant frequency of water molecule,"

http://www.alkalife.com/scihealth.aspx?id=13
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Old 28th September 2005, 04:54 AM   #3
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if I can narrow it to within a certain bandwith area... I believe that would still work
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Old 28th September 2005, 05:02 AM   #4
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after some digging I found this

http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/water/vibrat.html

I don't know what a lot of this means... but I Thought I would post it

what I'm looking to do is "shear" he oxygen from the hydrogen with sound... it's wierd I know.... but this document seems to show that it in fact is possible
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Old 28th September 2005, 05:42 AM   #5
maf_au is offline maf_au  Australia
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I wouldn't be surprised.

That's what happens with cavitation on a boat propellor, but by different means.

What's the application? Water transmit's sound pretty well, as I remember, but your speaker is going to have to be capable of shifting it...
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Old 28th September 2005, 06:14 AM   #6
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It's quite easy... Most high power SONAR systems can do it. Cavitation was always a concern of the higher power SONAR heads I designed. Things that could do 230-235 dB at 38 to 50 kHz. Even higher, further up in frequency. And could be done with just 300-500W of power.

Look for info on SONAR head design. However, if you're looking to do it for energy generation via release of hydrogen, it's terribly inefficient. It'll take A few hundred Watts to get a few Watts of hydrogen.

Dan Wiggins
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Old 28th September 2005, 07:06 AM   #7
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You might want to search the web for information about the best frequencies to use to show the sono-luminescence phenomena in water. There is still a conflict of opinion in science as to whether the sono-luminescence in collapsing micro-bubbles is due due to a novel energy generation mechanism or not.
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Old 28th September 2005, 07:33 AM   #8
Jennice is offline Jennice  Denmark
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Aren't we mixing two phenomenons here?

You want to split water. Ok. Aparently it can happen as a side effect of (i.e. ) sonars at 30-50 kHz.
However, I've been told that the RESONANCE frequency of water is 2.45 GHz, which is why a microwava oven operates at this frequency. It excites the water molecules and thereby cooks the contents of the oven. (this is supposedly why you can't microwave things that have no water in them). The most efficient way to excite water is at its resonance frequency.
I don't think you will wnt to play with this kind of frequencies for extended periods of time without proper shielding of the persons operating the equipment.

Jennice
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Old 28th September 2005, 01:38 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by DanWiggins
It's quite easy... Most high power SONAR systems can do it. Cavitation was always a concern of the higher power SONAR heads I designed. Things that could do 230-235 dB at 38 to 50 kHz. Even higher, further up in frequency. And could be done with just 300-500W of power.

Look for info on SONAR head design. However, if you're looking to do it for energy generation via release of hydrogen, it's terribly inefficient. It'll take A few hundred Watts to get a few Watts of hydrogen.

Dan Wiggins
Adire Audio®
ah thanks dan

A man named meyer did this in the past and found that electrolysis using this method is one of the most efficent ways.

if in fact it's that inefficent then I guess it's not worth it...

I think meyer had claimed this method exerted less force in the breaking apart of the atom than the energy bonding them had (which is impossible)
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Old 28th September 2005, 01:41 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jennice
Aren't we mixing two phenomenons here?

You want to split water. Ok. Aparently it can happen as a side effect of (i.e. ) sonars at 30-50 kHz.
However, I've been told that the RESONANCE frequency of water is 2.45 GHz, which is why a microwava oven operates at this frequency. It excites the water molecules and thereby cooks the contents of the oven. (this is supposedly why you can't microwave things that have no water in them). The most efficient way to excite water is at its resonance frequency.
I don't think you will wnt to play with this kind of frequencies for extended periods of time without proper shielding of the persons operating the equipment.

Jennice
2.45ghz isn't the resonance of water... check the link

I was thinking that with enough force on a symmetric pulling of the molecule you could tear it apart. so enough db with a 3.05um wavelength would tear all the atoms in question apart

I'm trying to convert around 11 gallons of water in to hydrogen and oxygen in under 10 min with only 220v from a normal house (probably impossible)

normal electrolysis is around 72% efficent
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