Building in Stainless steel and timber! - diyAudio
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Old 3rd December 2009, 11:12 PM   #1
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Default Building in Stainless steel and timber!

As time allows I will describe these in detail! They are a combination of natural Jarrah and stainless steel. Simple to build and gets away from the typical box shape. Any shape is possible!

I like the combination of leather and natural timbers but the finnish is up to you.

Originally these were a concept build, ie built to check the concept and find the flaws. I recently got them back from my brother who liked them but didn't want to pay for them.

Terry
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Old 4th December 2009, 12:26 AM   #2
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Nice idea - Bravo!
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Old 4th December 2009, 12:40 AM   #3
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How is the Jarrah to work with? I've been looking (for ages, actually) at building some baffles out of Jarrah, but I'm rubbish at working with timber.
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Old 4th December 2009, 01:48 AM   #4
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When I got these back my bro hadn't looked after them, one of the backs had faded, scratches etc so I took them apart, refinished them and am now redesigning the x-over. I thought what will now do is provide this two way as a complete build. Need a little time to put it together so you will get it as time allows.

To start with, the basis of the build is to use steel as the sides top and bottom. For those with access to a bending machine it will be easy. Otherwise you will have to go to a sheet metal shop and have them done for you. These were surprisingly inexpensive. Note that the more you have made, the cheaper each enclosure becomes. This is because most of the production time is in setting the machine up for each bend. After that each bend takes seconds.

Each enclosure is made in two halves, the halves are MIG or TIG welded together then the joints are cleaned up.

When you finnish this part you should have something like this. Of course the shape is limited only by your imagination and the restraints of a bending machine.

Jarrah can splinter if you use a router in the wrong direction, other than that, it is just another hard wood.

For those that may think steel will ring like a bell, it doesn't, you just need to know a few tricks. These finished speakers pass the knock test better than some MDF cabinets I've built. They are solid and they are anything but square.

Terry
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File Type: jpg 01-12-09_1421.jpg (289.6 KB, 578 views)
File Type: jpg 01-12-09_1422.jpg (223.2 KB, 494 views)
File Type: jpg 01-12-09_1423.jpg (211.9 KB, 455 views)
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Old 4th December 2009, 01:54 AM   #5
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Very cool!
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Old 4th December 2009, 02:11 AM   #6
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The attached is the frequency response in the x-over region. It is measured with gated sine waves via my LMS system. Primary design is via LEAP.

Drivers are Morel MW144 woofer and MDT40 tweeter. While these are expensive drivers I will point out something you may consider.

Using great drivers can make your x-over design a breeze and save on expensive components. Better to spend more on the driver and not have to fix problems with the x-over.

The two traces are:

0.22mH inductor on the woofer and 3.3uf cap on the tweeter (Bottom trace)

3.3uf on the tweeter. (top trace)

The MW144 is the only woofer I know of that you can get away with this and for this reason I tend to love it.

I said this was an easy build. X-over freq. is 6K. The tweeter has an easy life!
You get a single component x-over! Just look at how nice and smooth the response is throughout the x-over region.

Terry
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File Type: jpg 04-12-09_1322.jpg (456.1 KB, 436 views)
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Old 4th December 2009, 02:22 AM   #7
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If you consider building this and you can build it in a normal MDF enclosure. Consider also using the Morel MDT41. It is the same tweeter in a different housing. To mount it simply cut a round hole and push fit it in. It would I think look better. Alternatively you can also use the MDT 30 or 32 or their DMS equivalents. All these drivers have the same voice coil and silk dome. The MDT 40 and 42 have neodynium magnets while the MDT 30 and 32 have ferrite magnets.

Terry
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Old 4th December 2009, 10:17 AM   #8
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Next step is to line the inside surface of the steel. I used a common material designed for roofing. It has a pliable aluminium surface backed by a very sticky bitumus coating. Peel off the backing and apply it to the steel surface. Leave around 6mm (1/4") free around the edges. See photos.

This stops any acoustic energy from striking the steel. It works very well.

Next glue your chosen fabric to the outside steel surface and fold it around the edges. This method is what provides an airtight seal. I used man made hide, you can use whatever takes your (or the wifes) fancy. I applied the contact adhesive with an air spray gun. apply to both the steel and the back of the fabric, allow it to go off, then seat it in position.

Lastly add a layer of damping material as you would for any speaker.

Terry
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File Type: jpg 01-12-09_1424.jpg (230.1 KB, 126 views)
File Type: jpg 01-12-09_1425.jpg (308.4 KB, 154 views)
File Type: jpg 01-12-09_1426.jpg (249.2 KB, 175 views)
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Old 4th December 2009, 01:52 PM   #9
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I like it even more! Very nice building method. The bitumen works very well, I know.

A wrap of (faux) croc skin around the outside would be pretty.
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Old 4th December 2009, 01:57 PM   #10
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Why faux?

They almost look like insulated coffins for Ewoks...

I have tons of stainless steel; I may exploit this idea in the future.
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