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Old 21st June 2013, 10:56 AM   #41
bcmbob is offline bcmbob  United States
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"Originally Posted by AndrewT
I hope my Email mentioned how important this is.
Low voltage to fans and pumps risks non starting and the consequences that follow. Inserting a resistance to control speed from a higher voltage is just as bad at non starting. Actually the resistor method is slightly worse for non starting."


Your information was thorough and accurate - thanks. There are many pumps to choose from and that will be my focus over the next period. I do have one with the necessary circuits built in, but it is non-submersible and larger than I wanted for a compact chassis. May have to go in that direction eventually. The pump I used yesterday was an $8 eBay special. Now that I know the cooler works I'm willing to make a bigger investment. Might need a small IC circuit for start-up control.
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Last edited by bcmbob; 21st June 2013 at 11:10 AM.
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Old 21st June 2013, 08:30 PM   #42
sereal is offline sereal  Canada
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So much awesome going on here it hurts.

Only way you could top this is a oil submerge build.
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Old 21st June 2013, 08:39 PM   #43
bcmbob is offline bcmbob  United States
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CanAmMan: ".......Very interesting work...... I'm wondering if cryogenics, liquid hydrogen, and superconduction is next......"

I'll add oil to the list
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Old 26th June 2013, 07:25 AM   #44
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I wonder how high bias can be by using liquid nitrogen to cool it

http://i54.photobucket.com/albums/g9...ofBenching.jpg
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Old 26th June 2013, 11:46 AM   #45
AndrewT is offline AndrewT  Scotland
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semiconductors are no longer semiconducting at ~-50C
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Old 26th June 2013, 12:24 PM   #46
bcmbob is offline bcmbob  United States
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REG, that technique has been mentioned often and I'm sure it could be applied effectively. However, my primary project guidelines include:

1. Reduce the bulk of the heat dissipation elements.
2. Use readily available components.
3. Maximize simplicity by using as few components as possible.
4. Insure any potential leaks are isolated from all active circuits.
5. Allow easy dis-assembly of three discrete modules -cooler, PS and amp.
6. Have some fun doing it.

I have seen enough interest/response in these projects to convince me that implementing liquid cooling for audio equipment, if the process is practical, simple and safe, could be a realistic alternative for heat management.

Thanks for you comments and for participating on the thread, but I doubt LN would pass the WAF approval test in many households.


In keeping with the list above, I have made several mods to the F5 project.

Disconnecting the pump/reservoir was a real pain. Adding flexible links allows better access. It required shortening the tank but also eliminated several components in that section.

Added a back facing elbow to eliminate pump cavitation caused by air entering the pump during initial fill process.

Use of threaded rod that passes through the fan, radiator fin plates and chassis. That eliminated the wood mounting plate with blind screws, and the acrylic adhesive on both sides of the radiator that was applied in the earlier construction.

Also reversed the fan to push air through the radiator. The original orientation had the potential to reduce fan noise, but the amount of heat pushed through the chassis was excessive.

I'm in the process of adding the AC mains switch and thermistor system.
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Last edited by bcmbob; 26th June 2013 at 12:32 PM.
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Old 27th June 2013, 01:43 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bcmbob View Post
"Originally Posted by AndrewT
I hope my Email mentioned how important this is.
Low voltage to fans and pumps risks non starting and the consequences that follow. Inserting a resistance to control speed from a higher voltage is just as bad at non starting. Actually the resistor method is slightly worse for non starting."


Your information was thorough and accurate - thanks. There are many pumps to choose from and that will be my focus over the next period. I do have one with the necessary circuits built in, but it is non-submersible and larger than I wanted for a compact chassis. May have to go in that direction eventually. The pump I used yesterday was an $8 eBay special. Now that I know the cooler works I'm willing to make a bigger investment. Might need a small IC circuit for start-up control.
If starting becomes a problem you can add a time delay relay which will short the resistance to allow full power start then it will drop out and pump and fan will run at reduced power.
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Old 27th June 2013, 04:56 AM   #48
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Lovely work, reminds me of my AMD Thurnderbird rig, had that baby clocked to around 2ghz... Until i phase-cooled it. After the phase cooling my cpu temp read almost the same as it did with the h2o system, only with a minus at the front.
Maybe that could work for amps?
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Old 27th June 2013, 11:08 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nubskillz View Post
Lovely work, reminds me of my AMD Thurnderbird rig, had that baby clocked to around 2ghz... Until i phase-cooled it. After the phase cooling my cpu temp read almost the same as it did with the h2o system, only with a minus at the front.
Maybe that could work for amps?
That's why I was wondering, phase cooled or LN2'd, how much power can be taken out from a single silicon... For the sake of experimentation, not a real practical implementation. But phase cooling can be permanent, though....
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Old 27th June 2013, 03:12 PM   #50
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Phase cooling would be relatively easy. The part I'd worry about is condensation. On my PC I had to use an heating element around the core of the chip as to warm it back up to avoid condensation to happen, and subsequently a short.
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