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Old 23rd May 2008, 01:14 AM   #61
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You will also need power entry module and the two types I use most often are Q204 (on the left) and Q300, both available from digikey.com
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Old 23rd May 2008, 01:44 AM   #62
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I will start with connecting transformer primaries. In case of dual primaries, you can connect them either in parallel (to match 115V mains) or in series, to match 230V mains as per attached diagram (courtesy of Plitron).

The neutral wire from the mains connects to the transformer wire marked with dot, which is the start of the winding.

The wires are color coded, and may differ for other manufacturers.
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Old 23rd May 2008, 03:47 AM   #63
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My primaries are connected in parallel (the power module permanently attached to wooden board)
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Old 23rd May 2008, 03:53 AM   #64
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The Earth tab from power entry module is directly connected to metal part of the chassis. The mechanical connection may be required for safety reasons (no soldering), so check your local regulations.
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Old 23rd May 2008, 04:01 AM   #65
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Of course, don't forget about the fuse and use slow blow version. With 300VA transformer and no soft start, at least 4A rating is required (with 115V mains). In some instances even that blew occasionally so I normally use 5A SB fuses.

For 230V regions that would be half the fuse value.
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Old 23rd May 2008, 04:07 AM   #66
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This is how secondaries connect. For a given pair of wires (same secondary), it doesn't matter which wire connects to which pad, as long as the pads are marked the same (A1,A1 or A2, A2)
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Old 23rd May 2008, 04:09 AM   #67
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Torroidal transformer are not available in my country, have search but come to no avail.

A standard transformer with center-tap would be the next choice of mine, how much amp does it need to supply just a mono amp? i wanted to build for my guitar amp. would a 5A with 22v-0v-22v transformer adequate?
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Old 23rd May 2008, 04:15 AM   #68
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There is a spot for a LED on rectifier board and I like the small Panasonic LEDs available from DigiKey (part# P612). With those LEDs, 62K series resistor is required (R3 on rectifiers board, the long pin from the LED connect to square pad).

So the transformer is connected; before connecting rectifier board to the amp board we need to test voltages first.

If you didn't make any mistake, the simple test would be observing if LED lights up properly, but I will describe more appropriate method tomorrow
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Old 23rd May 2008, 04:17 AM   #69
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Quote:
Originally posted by casiomax
Torroidal transformer are not available in my country, have search but come to no avail.

A standard transformer with center-tap would be the next choice of mine, how much amp does it need to supply just a mono amp? i wanted to build for my guitar amp. would a 5A with 22v-0v-22v transformer adequate?

Sure, it will do. The info how to connect centertapped transformer to rectifier board was posted here: http://www.diyaudio.com/forums/showt...83#post1196283
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Old 23rd May 2008, 03:21 PM   #70
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It's time to power up the circuit and test voltages.

With a new circuit, it's a good idea to increase mains voltage slowly, starting from 0V all way up to 120V and monitor current draw, voltages and components temperature. For that purpose I use Variac (Variable Auto Transformer).

Alternatively you may consider "common 100 watt lightbulb wired in series with the mains supply" as described on Nuuk's site: http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/nuukspot/...AQ.html#gcfaq1

Click the image to open in full size.

It's also a good idea to use safety glasses
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