Go Back   Home > Forums > >
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Blogs Gallery Wiki Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Tubes / Valves All about our sweet vacuum tubes :) Threads about Musical Instrument Amps of all kinds should be in the Instruments & Amps forum

How To Solder Tips and Tricks
How To Solder Tips and Tricks
Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 19th December 2013, 12:05 AM   #1
Eddiegnz1 is offline Eddiegnz1  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Nort of Tampa Florida USA
Default How To Solder Tips and Tricks

I've soldered in the past long long ago. So I watched a few good tutorials on youtube to brush up and refresh my mind on how to solder. I feel pretty confident that it will come back to me easily so i'm not hesitant.

So the question is;

1) is there any specific recommendations that are more suitable for building a kit amp such as the Dynakit ST-120 kit ?

2) like any specific brand or type of solder or specific soldering temperatures or very useful specialized tools.

3) all of your tips and suggestions are more than appreciated

kind thanks,
Eddie
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2013, 12:28 AM   #2
H E Pennypacker is offline H E Pennypacker  Canada
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
The videos and just about any iron will do the trick.

Keep it clean, use 60/40 leaded solder (rosin core).. I won't rehash what you probably already watched in the video.

I have used "cheapy" soldering iron for years, there is no reason why you can't do a good joint with one.

That being said, like anything else they have nicer ones. I ordered a temperature adjustable unit, which has ~70watts available so it should recover better, heat heavier wire better etc.

I got the $100 Hakko. Weller also has a decent model at around $100.
There are other "profesional" brands like Metcal etc. at 5 to 10 times the price though.
It all comes down to what you want to spend.

Get a solder sucker or bulb, a stand, a sponge and brass wool for cleaning.

You can never have too much heat-shrink tubing in various sizes.

Small zip ties, small "micro-cutters" (Not for cutting steel), electrical tape, a complete set of small screw drivers, some kind of adjustable wrench even better would be a small socket set.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2013, 01:09 AM   #3
Eddiegnz1 is offline Eddiegnz1  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Nort of Tampa Florida USA
thanks so much H E Pennypacker, sound like good reasonable advice. i appreciate it
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2013, 01:17 AM   #4
Einric is offline Einric  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Einric's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Bozeman, MT
How To Solder Tips and Tricks
#1 - I would not use 60-40 Solder, it's way too easy for a beginner to make bad joints. I would instead use a quality 63/37 Eutectic solder (Like Kester 44).
#2 - I also have the $100 Hakko Iron and I prefer it over my Weller WES-51 (also ~ $100) at work but not as much as my Pace Station.
#3 - I have recently become VERY fond of Cardas Quad Eutectic solder, not because of the audiophoolery associated with it but simply the fact that it is a WONDERFUL solder to work with, it melts at 350F so it reduces your heating time, flows extremely well & the rosin doesn't stink. Percy Audio carries it for $60/lb +s&h, everywhere else it is easily double that price.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2013, 01:29 AM   #5
chrish is offline chrish  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
chrish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Sydney
I also have a Hakko station, very happy with it. I also have a cheap and nasty no temperature control high wattage iron for those soldering jobs involving large diameter wires such as used in ground bus etc. I would also recommend that you look at purchasing teflon coated wire. Once again, not because of the audiophoolery, but because the insulation won't melt if you accidentally touch it with the iron, making work so much easier.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2013, 01:30 AM   #6
davym is offline davym  Scotland
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: The Wetback
I second the Cardas Quad recommendation, easiest solder to use yet, melts like butter, hard to make a bad job using it even using a cheap iron.

Only downside is it aint cheap to buy but you can get shorter lengths on ebay.

If you don't want to spend a lot on a soldering iron, the Antex XS25 type is decent, affordable and you can get a range of tip's for it.

Practice on scrap till your good to go.

Oh and some spray to treat/cool down burns can sometimes be handy too. I've been soldering for over 30 years and still occasionally get careless and burn a finger.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2013, 02:25 AM   #7
Junk Audio is offline Junk Audio  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Junk Audio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Jersey
What's soldering without stink?
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2013, 09:38 AM   #8
H E Pennypacker is offline H E Pennypacker  Canada
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
lol I find it almost impossible to burn my fingers with a soldering iron, let alone needing spray to cool down the burns.

Are you holding it the right way?

Sorry I found this so amusing.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2013, 03:19 PM   #9
spatten is offline spatten  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Make sure the surface of what you are soldering is clean - if you are using any old parts. Most metals oxidize easily, making for poor solder joints.

I've used 10$ Weller 30W irons, and $1000k Hakko temp controlled stations. Yes, there's a difference but it's not critical - especially when working with components on the tube amplifier scale. If you start using much surface mount than I would go with a nicer iron, maybe a scope or lenss.

Having a clamp or vise can make many situations easier. It often feels like you need 3 hands!
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th December 2013, 04:05 PM   #10
adamhc75 is offline adamhc75  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
I have used the radio shack digital soldering station for 3 years. It cost me 50 dollars on sale when I got it. Its full price is about 70 dollars. It heats to the set temp in about 20-30 seconds and to me seems to hold a very stable temp even when working on heavier stuff. I use it about 4-6 hours a day on average and have only had to replace 1 tip at a cost of 4 dollars.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


How To Solder Tips and TricksHide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tube Tips/Tricks for beginners SamK2012 Tubes / Valves 10 19th November 2012 12:12 PM
Breadboarding/Prototyping - How to and Tips/Tricks Steven-H Equipment & Tools 60 26th August 2010 02:37 PM
Any tricks to desoldering using a cheapo solder sucker? Glowbug Construction Tips 20 2nd June 2010 09:31 PM
Couple of tips/tricks peace brainerd Everything Else 0 10th April 2006 03:57 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:15 PM.


Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 14.29%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2019 diyAudio
Wiki