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Relative Humidity Attenuating HF
Relative Humidity Attenuating HF
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Old 18th November 2012, 03:03 AM   #1
TV7 is offline TV7  Australia
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Default Relative Humidity Attenuating HF

Had my MC275 set up just the way I liked it yesterday in the cool afternoon. Today just before a storm was due to pass through the humidity was much higher than yesterday, and I noticed a discernibly less pronounced sound from my tweeters. It sure seems the humidity has affected the HF in the air, much less than lower frequencies as we all know suffer less loss due to molecular vibration ect....

Am I right in assuming this? has anyone else noticed this with their system? I posted it in Valves/tubes forum as the amp is tube based....

Discussions? / comments?
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Old 18th November 2012, 03:15 AM   #2
freax is offline freax
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Could be a higher pressure (caused by the incoming storm) atmosphere that is causing your discrepancy. = More pressure on your ear drums.
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Old 18th November 2012, 03:21 AM   #3
TV7 is offline TV7  Australia
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Could very well be. With higher humidity comes greater pressure. It could be physiological, I thought more medium related though.....
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Old 18th November 2012, 04:13 AM   #4
Conrad Hoffman is offline Conrad Hoffman  United States
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I doubt the system is much affected by the weather, but I know I am. Weather systems affect arthritis and sinuses and who knows what else. Sinuses affect my hearing and pain affects my general attitude and that affects how I perceive music.
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Old 18th November 2012, 04:29 AM   #5
TV7 is offline TV7  Australia
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I suppose my hearing is akin to taking an arrow to the knee when bad weather is around. However I'm sure there is some correlation, much the same way sound travels through solid objects differently than air, and not at all in a vacuum.
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Old 18th November 2012, 07:51 AM   #6
Miles Prower is offline Miles Prower  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TV7 View Post
It sure seems the humidity has affected the HF in the air, much less than lower frequencies as we all know suffer less loss due to molecular vibration ect....
Humidity does affect HF, but that doesn't begin until you're up around 900MHz or so.

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Am I right in assuming this? has anyone else noticed this with their system? I posted it in Valves/tubes forum as the amp is tube based....

Discussions? / comments?
Paper speaker cones? These are audibly affected by humidity.
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Old 18th November 2012, 08:28 AM   #7
pinkmouse is offline pinkmouse  Europe
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Relative Humidity Attenuating HF
Humidity and temperature can cause dispersion effects over very long throws, but to get this effect indoors you'd need a room large enough to form its own microclimate, like an airship hangar or the NASA construction building.
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Old 18th November 2012, 08:36 AM   #8
freax is offline freax
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Its possible also that your speakers are so perfectly sealed that a pressure system coming in could affect its volume and not be fast enough to adjust to a pressure change such as a thunderstorm.

By pushing against the cones.

It might not be your ears at all, it could be your speakers. What kind of speakers do you have? It wouldn't affect a ported setup, lol.

You might want to add a stylish brass pressure screw valve to them so that you can adjust for this whenever it occurs.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Green-Pla...item4d06797ea1

Last edited by freax; 18th November 2012 at 08:43 AM.
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Old 18th November 2012, 12:07 PM   #9
Rundmaus is offline Rundmaus  Germany
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... what is the connection between this thread and tubes?

Wondering,
Andreas

EDIT: Just found the O/P's statement about that. With the same reasoning, it could have been posted in the PS forum, as the amp almost surely has a power supply. Or in the digital sources section as you probably used a digital source.

Last edited by Rundmaus; 18th November 2012 at 12:10 PM.
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Old 18th November 2012, 12:30 PM   #10
freax is offline freax
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Or the ears section, of which there is none, the OP suspected it to be a problem with his amplifier, which it could still be.

For all I know there could be a faulty/cracked tube socket which is being affected by higher humidity.

There might even be a change with the specifications of the output transformers under high humidity, maybe they have an issue which is causing them to act like an air capacitor = affected by moisture. Though I suspect the OPT's in this amplifier are sealed/potted in epoxy, clarification? It is possible that they've been overheated/stressed and that has caused the epoxy to leak out, especially if its wax insulated, who knows! Though I doubt....

There could be moisture building up on the volume control, which would alter the conductivity between the knob axle and the chassis/thread portion of a pot.

Last edited by freax; 18th November 2012 at 12:37 PM.
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