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The food thread
The food thread
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Old 19th January 2019, 04:52 PM   #10231
DPH is offline DPH  United States
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Pretty darn sure no one uses a 24" "knife" anymore for any purpose beyond an art piece.

(I suppose machetes would be an exception)
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Old 19th January 2019, 04:53 PM   #10232
jackinnj is online now jackinnj  United States
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The food thread
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A lens is ground to shape
Not necessarily -- Freddie Capasso:

Capasso Group >> Tunable metalenses

also inventor of the quantum cascade laser.
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Old 19th January 2019, 05:42 PM   #10233
scott wurcer is offline scott wurcer  United States
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Pretty darn sure no one uses a 24" "knife" anymore for any purpose beyond an art piece.

(I suppose machetes would be an exception)
No, I would have a picture to post of the guy using one to break down 2000lb tuna at Tsukiji market, but he pointed it at me and said "no photos".

40 sec or so in YouTube

The guy standing on the "wrong" side, don't miss.
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Old 19th January 2019, 05:44 PM   #10234
DPH is offline DPH  United States
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There's always an exception. I should know better than making wide-sweeping comments like that.

Must have been a sight to see!
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Old 19th January 2019, 06:17 PM   #10235
scott wurcer is offline scott wurcer  United States
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Default Anyone try this?

After all the meat tenderizing discussions I came across a comparison of various techniques and the winner was surprising. Vacu-packing a cut of meat along with a simple puree of fresh pineapple for 12hr. or so made a dramatic difference without (supposedly) adding any pineapple flavor. I have hard time classifying this as some kind of horrible additive or process. I know some meat tenderizers are based on fruit enzyme extracts but this simple process does not ring "industrial" to me.

I plan to try it this week with an Aussie grass fed London broil.
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Old 19th January 2019, 06:42 PM   #10236
simon7000 is offline simon7000  United States
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Originally Posted by nezbleu View Post
I believe a 24" knife is called a "sword".
It sounds like you are removing a lot of material, and you don't want to get the steel hot lest you remove the temper (maybe should have created the edge before tempering?), so I'll give you a couple of hours. I assume you are a master craftsman so I will let you overcharge for your time, let's say $100/hr. So no, $3K to sharpen a knife may be a lot of things, but never a bargain.

And a mirror polish on a working edge? I hope you never have to cut anything with that knife, or you will need a month of sharpening between uses. Heaven forbid it should ever touch a strop, never mind a steel.
No the edge was there before tempering. The blade edge is about 16 inches after the guard, handle and decorative pommel. A large person would wield it as a knife. A small person could use it as a sword. In more modern usage such as the U.S. Civil War swords were often used as forged. The duller edge would inflict more damage.

The amount of material removed is extremely small. It is just that the Damascus steel is so hard that it wears out the grit amazingly fast. It is not quite a mirror polish nor is it just the edge. Damascus steel has a pattern that is brought out to look prettier. With the 220 grit I am still removing milling marks over the entire surface.

I expect the first real use may be carving turkey.

It is intended as a wedding present for a couple who have a wierd collection hobby. My usual wedding gifts have been commercial knife sets. One neice didn't understand why she got one as she already had knives. Of course after she used them, she found out the difference between good knives and ordinary ones.

BTY we charge $95.00 for technician time.
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Old 19th January 2019, 06:43 PM   #10237
martin clark is offline martin clark  Europe
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We could discuss the difference between tedium and meditative contemplation.

I find proper sharpening requires the later. Believe it or not the steel will tell you when you are doing it right.
A rare visitor here - but this jumped out at me, in a good way.

I remember being shown how to sharpen things by my grandfather, a very patient, loving, gentle man, an old-shool pharmacist who worked with his hands for relaxation, one of those 'could make or fix or finesse anything' people.

Anyway - I remember one wet Saturday while 'helping' in the workshop being shown how to sharpen a chisel, maintaining and if necessary restoring the two bevels accurately; how to use the oilstone and differing stroke patterns to ensure they were accurate, square, true and finally - sharp.
Then how to strop (lap) that sharp edge to be sharp. And after a few hours when I'd got somewhat acceptable results on 1/4" and 1" chisels we moved onto a 2" Plane blade (for one of the many beautiful old Stanley planes I later inherited from him; still have and use); we'd got to the 'look at newspaper, it falls apart' stage when my parents came by and it was time to go home that evening.

- ' oh, and don't tell your mother!' followed me out of the door; because I was 6 yrs old.

I can still do it all (and probably blindfold) from recall of the touch and feel learnt that day. It remains a joy to use the same large slab of corundum to do so. Meditative indeed!

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Old 19th January 2019, 06:47 PM   #10238
simon7000 is offline simon7000  United States
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Originally Posted by scott wurcer View Post
After all the meat tenderizing discussions I came across a comparison of various techniques and the winner was surprising. Vacu-packing a cut of meat along with a simple puree of fresh pineapple for 12hr. or so made a dramatic difference without (supposedly) adding any pineapple flavor. I have hard time classifying this as some kind of horrible additive or process. I know some meat tenderizers are based on fruit enzyme extracts but this simple process does not ring "industrial" to me.

I plan to try it this week with an Aussie grass fed London broil.
Papaya is the standard go to, pineapple works almost as well. Of course the traditional was onion but it does add flavor. Of course when you cook with it, even the toughest cuts fall apart.

My secret marinade is saki. Few recognize the added flavor and it clearly demonstrates what alcohol really does to meat like you and me.
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Old 19th January 2019, 07:40 PM   #10239
scott wurcer is offline scott wurcer  United States
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Of course the traditional was onion but it does add flavor. Of course when you cook with it, even the toughest cuts fall apart.
My mother's liver and onions never fell apart.
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Old 19th January 2019, 08:18 PM   #10240
jackinnj is online now jackinnj  United States
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The food thread
btw, if you are allergic to oak, you're probably allergic to pineapple.
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