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Old 16th November 2018, 08:37 PM   #11
jmpsmash is offline jmpsmash
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I finished it last night.

I believe Neotech made the DG201 to fit the NEI-3001 mk2. Internally to the DG201 sleeve there are fine screw threads that fits the thickness of the NEI-3001 exactly. All that was needed was to screw the NEI-3001 casing into that. There is no need to use the compression screws to secure the cable at all. It was a perfect tightness.
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Old 16th November 2018, 09:30 PM   #12
Jeff Glowacki is offline Jeff Glowacki  United States
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I literally just received notice of this thread... Just in time to see it wrap up.


FWIW, we use the screws as customers are tough on cables And, while your mileage may vary, we generally connect the shield to Grd (return) at the source.
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Old 16th November 2018, 10:13 PM   #13
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
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Jeff, when would you advise doing this rather than using coax?
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Old 19th November 2018, 03:00 PM   #14
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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Those situations where a higher than usual ground return resistance is required?
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Old 19th November 2018, 04:58 PM   #15
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
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Thanks, that makes sense. In my situation it probably would be best
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Old 19th November 2018, 06:02 PM   #16
Jeff Glowacki is offline Jeff Glowacki  United States
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Quote:
Jeff, when would you advise doing this rather than using coax?

There is not a right or wrong answer here. People use balanced cable for single ended connection because it often sounds better, because they don't know better, because they are looking for a particular characteristic impedance, because they want to partially decouple the shield, because they want to float the shield. There are lots of possibilities.



Quote:
Those situations where a higher than usual ground return resistance is required?

Some balanced cables use larger gauge signal runs than most coax shields, so I would say not.
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Old 19th November 2018, 06:19 PM   #17
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
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If DF96 meant that I misunderstood. I thought he was referring to when the return resistance was increased to reduce a ground loop current.
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Old 20th November 2018, 03:46 PM   #18
Guild is offline Guild  United States
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Ground the shield at the source end.
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Old 20th November 2018, 05:07 PM   #19
DF96 is offline DF96  England
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A coax shield is likely to have lower resistance than a signal wire within a cable, even if the shield uses thinner copper. Of course, you could have a thick twisted pair with less resistance than a thin coax.

I can't think of a good reason to raise the ground return resistance, as it means that any ground loop current develops a voltage here rather than somewhere else where it may do less harm.

I suspect that most people do it because it is popular. It is popular because a lot of people do it. Fortunately, in most situations it will do little harm.

I can think of one situation where a twisted pair inside a shield is appropriate for an unbalanced connection: when the source is electrically floating so a pseudo-balanced connection can be used. The most common example is an MM cartridge.
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Old 20th November 2018, 05:16 PM   #20
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
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Raising the signal return resistance on one channel interconnect can reduce the cross channel hum loop, not ideal, but simple.
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