Go Back   Home > Forums > >
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Blogs Gallery Wiki Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Software Tools SPICE, PCB CAD, speaker design and measurement software, calculators

Use of LTSpice for design of vacuum tube phono preamps with passive equalization
Use of LTSpice for design of vacuum tube phono preamps with passive equalization
Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 1st March 2019, 05:05 PM   #1
benman94 is offline benman94
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Default Use of LTSpice for design of vacuum tube phono preamps with passive equalization

Hello all,

I was wondering if I could get a quick sanity check to ensure that I have a reasonable basic design process for a tube RIAA phono preamp. What follows is the process I've been using; I am fairly certain it is more or less correct, but it would be nice to have confirmation of that.

Stage 1: Design the actual gain stage(s) using normal methods, looking at distortion, reasonable frequency response, overload conditions, etc, and tweaking until you're satisfied with the result. For this example I put a single gain stage (probably a rather crummy one at that) together just to play with, followed by the coupling cap and grid leak to the next tube that would be in a real phono preamp.

Stage 2A: Determine the nominal output impedance from the gain stage being examined by placing a current source from ground to the node of interest, setting the AC current of that current source to amplitude 1, and then running an AC sweep.

Stage 2B: Plotting the magnitude of the voltage on the node in question, dividing that plot by a factor of I(I1) or whatever the current supplied by the current source is, and reading the result off the plot, now in ohms (or kohms, etc).

Stage 3A: Use a voltage controlled voltage source as the input to the gain stage in question. Set the Laplace transform of the VCVS to the inverse of the equalization curve you're trying to correct for (Columbia Lp, RIAA, London FFRR, whatever). In this case I'm using RIAA.

Stage 3B: Run a frequency sweep to ensure that the inverse equalization looks correct.

Stage 4A: Calculate the correct values of capacitance and resistance for the passive equalization network using the known formulas. Say, for instance, using the kabusa.com calculator, set R1 to be the impedance found in Stage 2A, in this case ~71 kilohms. Insert the equalization network, and set the resistance and capacitance values to those calculated.

Stage 4B: Run the sweep again, and check to see how much error the calculated network has. In this case, it doesn't look great, but doesn't look too terrible either.

Finally, take the calculated values of the caps and resistors for the equalization network and play around with them, trying to find tolerable values that are commercially available, or series and parallel combinations of available components, while trying not to completely destroy the conformance to the equalization curve in question.

Attached are PNGs showing the process I've used. Is this method fundamentally correct, or am I making huge mistakes I'm not aware of?
Attached Images
File Type: png Step_1.png (43.5 KB, 25 views)
File Type: png Step_2A.png (43.4 KB, 24 views)
File Type: png Step_2B.png (16.4 KB, 23 views)
File Type: png Step_3A.png (41.7 KB, 25 views)
File Type: png Step_3B.png (12.7 KB, 23 views)
File Type: png Step_4A.png (44.7 KB, 11 views)
File Type: png Step_4B.png (13.6 KB, 12 views)
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st March 2019, 05:21 PM   #2
rayma is offline rayma  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by benman94 View Post
What follows is the process I've been using
The second tube stage will also have some Miller effect input capacitance.
This should be included in the model, in parallel with C5 or R5.

Last edited by rayma; 1st March 2019 at 05:25 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 1st March 2019, 06:59 PM   #3
benman94 is offline benman94
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
I hadn't considered that yet as I was just playing with the single gain stage for the moment to make sure I could actually get a reasonably flat response back out of the equalization network, but you're correct of course, and I'll start considering that as I continue to play around with it.

I have to say, the more I learn about LTSpice's various functionalities, the more I love it. Digital bread-boarding is about a hundredth of the effort of actually wiring up a temporary circuit.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Use of LTSpice for design of vacuum tube phono preamps with passive equalizationHide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tube Phono Preamps jdrouin Tubes / Valves 266 5th March 2018 07:08 PM
Hi-end definitive vacuum tube phono pre audiodesign Tubes / Valves 65 20th August 2010 10:48 AM
hi-end vacuum tube phono preamplifier audiodesign Tubes / Valves 0 23rd February 2010 02:56 PM
Hi-end Phono vacuum tube preamplifier MM audiodesign Vendor's Bazaar 0 5th March 2009 06:31 AM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:38 PM.


Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 14.29%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2019 diyAudio
Wiki