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Controlled vs wide dispersion in a normal living room environment..
Controlled vs wide dispersion in a normal living room environment..
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Old 18th February 2019, 03:40 PM   #731
onionhead is offline onionhead  United States
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Very helpful, you have given me clues to further improve my understanding. My room was built with concrete floor, dry wall ceiling / walls and some glass windows. Thanks again.
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Old 18th February 2019, 06:50 PM   #732
Jakob2 is offline Jakob2  Germany
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Your welcome.
Although there is nothing ensured without measuring the properties of your room, at a first glance iŽd say that the construction might lead to less severe problems in the modal region, because the drywood walls and ceiling along with the glass windows are less stiff in comparison to concrete or stone walls and will therefore probably already provide some attenuation for the standing waves.
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Old 18th February 2019, 11:25 PM   #733
gedlee is offline gedlee  United States
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It is as hard to define the transition from modal to geometric acoustics in words as it is analytically. That's because we can see characteristics of both types of acoustics in this transition area. No room in a home is going to be geometric below 100-150 Hz, nor is it likely that we will see modal behavior above 200-250 Hz. The room that you mention is a little smaller than mine, mine is well sealed and heavily damped at LFs with dampened wall construction. It is modal below about 120 Hz, and clearly geometric above 200 Hz. Your room will probably have numbers higher than this.
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Old 19th February 2019, 10:54 PM   #734
plasnu is offline plasnu  United States
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Originally Posted by Jakob2 View Post
Your welcome.
Although there is nothing ensured without measuring the properties of your room, at a first glance iŽd say that the construction might lead to less severe problems in the modal region, because the drywood walls and ceiling along with the glass windows are less stiff in comparison to concrete or stone walls and will therefore probably already provide some attenuation for the standing waves.
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Old 20th February 2019, 05:31 PM   #735
Jakob2 is offline Jakob2  Germany
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Ok, but what do you mean by that?

I assume that it is sort of selfexplanatory to you, but unfortunately it isnŽt for me ......
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Old 21st February 2019, 01:31 AM   #736
Monteverdi is offline Monteverdi  United States
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Originally Posted by Jakob2 View Post
Your welcome.
Although there is nothing ensured without measuring the properties of your room, at a first glance iŽd say that the construction might lead to less severe problems in the modal region, because the drywood walls and ceiling along with the glass windows are less stiff in comparison to concrete or stone walls and will therefore probably already provide some attenuation for the standing waves.
I was reading (and it somewhat agrees with my experience) that the voicing of loudspeakers by American companies mostly have higher low frequency output compared to European ones as drywall is more standard in the US than in Europe to compensate for higher losses at low frequencies. Drywall construction (especially single sheet) is more leaky largely below 100Hz.
Standing waves are part of low frequencies room acoustics and if the room modes are well spaced is attenuation something positive?
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Old 21st February 2019, 03:15 AM   #737
33Polkhigh is online now 33Polkhigh  United States
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Regarding "spaciousness" and early reflections. Is it safe to assume that if the object that the sound is reflecting from is something very uniform, like a table, that it will have a bad effect on frequency response and sound bad?

But if the object is more random, like a pile of of rocks, the sound will reflect more randomly and be spacious. Also I imagine speakers with wider horizontal dispersion, especially arrays, would do this better.
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Last edited by 33Polkhigh; 21st February 2019 at 03:18 AM.
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Old 21st February 2019, 04:07 AM   #738
bwaslo is offline bwaslo  United States
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Controlled vs wide dispersion in a normal living room environment..
I think that's the general idea about diffusors, mathematics aside.
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Old 21st February 2019, 07:53 AM   #739
33Polkhigh is online now 33Polkhigh  United States
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Room Acoustics

It seems that its the lateral reflections that we perceive as good and contribute to spaciousness. But obviously one wants to absorb if the off axis sound itself isn't good.

So "good" lateral reflections are the ones that might want to be diffused. Array type speakers excel at this.

Ethan Winer argues more for a dead room Early Reflections Are Not Beneficial
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Old 21st February 2019, 08:35 AM   #740
Bill Coltrane is offline Bill Coltrane  Netherlands
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Originally Posted by 33Polkhigh View Post
Room Acoustics

It seems that its the lateral reflections that we perceive as good and contribute to spaciousness. But obviously one wants to absorb if the off axis sound itself isn't good.

So "good" lateral reflections are the ones that might want to be diffused. Array type speakers excel at this.

Ethan Winer argues more for a dead room Early Reflections Are Not Beneficial
The logic flaw in Ethan Winters reasoning is that there is not 1 reflection, there are many.
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