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-   -   Is It Possible to Get more than 16Bit/48KHz using TI TAS1020B, on Windows XP? (https://www.diyaudio.com/forums/pc-based/363676-16bit-48khz-using-ti-tas1020b-windows-xp.html)

spaceman5 28th November 2020 12:00 PM

Is It Possible to Get more than 16Bit/48KHz using TI TAS1020B, on Windows XP?
 
Hi All


I am currently using a DAC by SMSL, called SMSL M3.

It has 3 inputs:
1) USB (using a TI TAS1020B chip as USB->I2S)
2) Optical
3) Coaxial


This AC is connected to a Desktop PC running Windows XP SP3.

Is it possible to get more than 16Bit/48KHz on Windows XP somehow?



If I go to Control Panel -> Sounds and Audio Devices -> Audio Tab,
and click the "Advanced" button,
then under the "Performance" tab, the sliders are all at "Full"/"Best"..


https://i.postimg.cc/s1d5fcLH/Advanc...Properties.png


Small note:
When I first got this DAC, I did not have to install anything, I connected it and it worked plug and play..

When I now search google for TAS1020B, I do not even find a Product Page under TI's website..
I was hoping to find one, to maybe find some driver that will enable me to get more than 116/48, but couldn't.

I hope someone here has an idea/experience on how to change this..


Thank you

linuxfan 29th November 2020 03:39 AM

The CS4398 DAC chip in the SMSL M3 supports samplerates up to 192kHz, but 192kHz can only be realised using the s/pdif interface.
The M3's TAS1020B USB interface supports a maximum samplerate of 96kHz.

So you want to play 96kHz audio files (bit-perfectly) under Windows XP - I think you will need:
i) vendor-supplied driver
ii) playback application which supports WDM and/or kernel-streaming output methods. (WASAPI would be even better, but it's not supported under Windows XP).

Quote:

Originally Posted by spaceman5 (https://www.diyaudio.com/forums/pc-based/363676-16bit-48khz-using-ti-tas1020b-windows-xp-post6428938.html#post6428938)
When I first got this DAC, I did not have to install anything, I connected it and it worked plug and play.

OK there's your first problem - the generic Windows XP USB audio driver probably doesn't support high samplerates.
So I first suggest you install the latest SMSL M3 driver, from here -
S.M.S.L Audio Official -双木三林官网

Now I don't know what your preferred audio playback program is, but for testing I suggest foobar2000. Get it here -
Download foobar2000
Also download the kernel-streaming and ASIO output components -
foobar2000: Components Repository - ASIO support
foobar2000: Components Repository - Kernel Streaming support - this is a .dll file which should be extracted to a temporary folder.
Launch foobar2000 and go to File > Preferences > Components
Use Windows Explorer to drag foo_out_ks.dll and foo_out_asio.fb2k-component into the right side window.
Click "Apply" and restart foobar2000.

Finally go to File > Preferences > Playback > Output
In the dropdown menu for "Device" hopefully you will now see a kernel-streaming or ASIO option for your M3.

spaceman5 29th November 2020 12:38 PM

Wow,
thank you so much linuxfan

I was not aware tht the M3 has a driver..
In the M3's product page it's not listed,
only when going to Support -> Driver Download, then I can see in the list of products, which M3 is included there too.

I downloaded it and will check it now,
hopefully the driver also supports Windows XP..


After that I will continue with the rest of the useful tips.

Thank you for this help

spaceman5 29th November 2020 12:43 PM

BTW

In addition to improving the USB path,
I would also like after that to enable the SPDIF Optical path,
to achieve the maximum that the DAC can work on.

Quote:

Originally Posted by linuxfan (https://www.diyaudio.com/forums/pc-based/363676-16bit-48khz-using-ti-tas1020b-windows-xp-post6429999.html#post6429999)
The CS4398 DAC chip in the SMSL M3 supports samplerates up to 192kHz, but 192kHz can only be realised using the s/pdif interface.
The M3's TAS1020B USB interface supports a maximum samplerate of 96kHz.

You're right..

https://i.postimg.cc/Rhx1Tz7Z/Sample...d-Bit-Rate.png


What should I use for SPDIF (Optical) out?

Maybe some USB->Optical adapter?
Any one that is recommended, and should work on Windows XP too?

phofman 29th November 2020 06:56 PM

Many desktop motherboards have spdif header onboard from their internal Intel HDA. There are cheap header - TOSLINK/SPDIF adapters on ebay e.g. SPDIF optical and RCA out plate cable bracket for asus msi gigabyte motherboa ZT | eBay . Then it would be only about your Intel HDA drivers.

spaceman5 29th November 2020 07:12 PM

My motherboard actually got that - 2 pins for SPDIF..

https://i.postimg.cc/hjk5Pz7G/SPDIF.png

So I will order this SPDIF Panel, thank you.


BTW, until it arrives, how can I know what Sample Rate and Bits per Sample will the Optical SPDIF on the mtherboard support?

The manual of the motherboard does not seem to mention it..

The only thing I found is
"The front panel audio header supports Intel High Definition audio (HD) and AC'97 audio".


When searching Google for "Intel High Definition Audio", I got:
Quote:

Intel High Definition Audio (IHDA) (also called HD Audio or development codename Azalia)
is a specification for the audio sub-system of personal computers.
It was released by Intel in 2004 as successor to its AC'97 PC audio standard.
Intel High Definition Audio - Wikipedia


So IHDA is newer than AC'97..


They continue:
Quote:

The Intel High Definition Audio specification includes the following features:
Up to 15 input and 15 output streams
Up to 16 PCM audio channels per stream
Sample resolutions of 8–32 bits
Sample rates of 6–192 kHz

So should I assume that on the Optical SPDIF header on the motherboard it should also transmit in 32bit/192KHz?

If yes, then that's wonderful..

phofman 29th November 2020 07:20 PM

Intel HDA supports that easily. But what counts is your HDA codec and especially drivers. What is your MB model?

spaceman5 29th November 2020 07:25 PM

The motherboard is Gigabyte B75M-D3H (rev. 1.0).
GA-B75M-D3H (rev. 1.0) Overview | Motherboard - GIGABYTE Global

The Audio Driver installation file is named "mb_driver_audio_realtek_azalia_7series.exe".
"Azalia" is the development codename for Intel High Definition Audio, as written in Wikipedia..

So that's what I have installed on that Windows XP..

Is that enough?

What is my HDA codec?

phofman 29th November 2020 07:57 PM

Quote:

What is my HDA codec?
As that link you posted says: Realtek ALC887 codec

https://www.hardwaresecrets.com/datasheets/ALC887.pdf

Quote:

The ALC887 supports 16/20/24-bit SPDIF input and output functions with sampling rate of up to 192kHz
It's only about your drivers, if they support the full features of your HW.

I would try Asio4All on top of your drivers and see if the SPDIF output is available. If so, you can try some 192/24 playback e.g. in foobar.

spaceman5 29th November 2020 08:16 PM

Thank you very much.
Will check experiment with it in the following days.

Hopefully the SPDIF Panel will arrive soon :)


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