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-   -   Scanner for plates? (https://www.diyaudio.com/forums/equipment-and-tools/340077-scanner-plates.html)

Destroyer OS 10th July 2019 08:44 PM

Scanner for plates?
 
Ok, I know this will be a little out there but I'm looking for a way to scan plates like used for the back of an amplifier, and every other electronics thing. And It would be ideal if it could do some larger stuff like you'd find in a recording studio. I've seen document scanners but they require what's passing through to be paper.

Any ideas? Thoughts? I don't need photo quality. Holes and exact size might be sufficient, but markings wouldn't hurt.

PRR 11th July 2019 05:01 AM

1 Attachment(s)
??? I often scan non-paper on my flat-bed scanner.

Here's two random bits of handy equipment, scanned. Where details lay on the surface they are clear. Stuff a few mm off the glass is out of focus.

Destroyer OS 11th July 2019 08:03 AM

That works way better than I expected! I guess I'll just go for a flatbed whatever.

Destroyer OS 12th July 2019 01:54 AM

This might work, but I don't know for sure.

rayma 12th July 2019 02:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Destroyer OS (https://www.diyaudio.com/forums/equipment-and-tools/340077-scanner-plates-post5848095.html#post5848095)
I'm looking for a way to scan plates like used for the back of an amplifier,
and every other electronics thing.

Most better copiers (like in a library or Kinko's) can scan a flat object
to a flash drive, or print.

Destroyer OS 12th July 2019 03:39 AM

I suppose I could do that prior to owning a machine.

I actually noticed that you can buy an all-in-one printer for $200 with a 11x17" flatbed. That's $300-500 cheaper than just the scanner. Now I'm sure the scanner isn't as good, but the requirements are very low for this.

rayma 12th July 2019 03:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Destroyer OS (https://www.diyaudio.com/forums/equipment-and-tools/340077-scanner-plates-post5849243.html#post5849243)
I'm sure the scanner isn't as good, but the requirements are very low for this.

Scanners can change the scale factor, so add calibration scales in the scan for adjusting.

Destroyer OS 12th July 2019 03:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rayma (https://www.diyaudio.com/forums/equipment-and-tools/340077-scanner-plates-post5849250.html#post5849250)
Scanners can change the scale factor, so add calibration scales in the scan for adjusting.

Indeed, I figured that would help for converting into some vector format.

PRR 14th July 2019 05:11 AM

> you can buy an all-in-one printer for $200 with a 11x17" flatbed.

That scan was from a $330 all-in-one *color laser* machine, though only a 12" bed.

The old ~~$200 AIO inkjet scans about the same; it's probably a $120 machine now, so a 11x17 @ $200 seems possible.

I'm not sure what resolution really means on modern scanners. If I slide the DPI real high it just takes forever to acquire a way-huge image. Macro objects like calculators and hi-fi panels probably don't need over 300dpi. The newer/costlier scanner does get the contrast a little better than the old one. Pencil-sketches needed big correction on the old machine, less on the new, but this is mere software and may be random-choice on each product.

JMFahey 14th July 2019 08:09 AM

Scanners create bitmaps of various resolutions, but some Graphics software such as Corel Draw has a "Trace" function which lets you create a vector based drawing out of a bitmap.


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