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-   -   difference between mixed mono and summed mono (https://www.diyaudio.com/forums/car-audio/109795-difference-mixed-mono-summed-mono.html)

Clipped 9th October 2007 09:04 PM

difference between mixed mono and summed mono
 
what exactly is the difference between mixed mono and summed mono?

which type of mono signal do amplifiers usually run nowadays when an amp is bridged?

thanx

Flyin11 9th October 2007 09:38 PM

One makes your hair fall out..The other one doesn't :p :p

ppia600 10th October 2007 01:06 AM

Maybe:


Mixed mono = The signal is stereo until it is bridged together at the output stages

Summed mono = The signal is combined in the preamp area into one mono signal, then each stereo channel of the final output stages are fed the same signal.


(Just my guess as I've only been in car audio since the late 80's, I'm probably wrong)

Clipped 10th October 2007 08:34 AM

ok, im probably gonna get jumped on for this but...

discarding stereo seperation and playing a mono signal through all speakers my system was louder... is this because all speakers are playing both left and right signals?

i noticed this when i was using my rockford AF4/HD crossover...its broken now though... damn hybrid chips

Conrad Hoffman 10th October 2007 12:34 PM

Not sure if this is related to the question, but if you record a mono record with a stereo cartridge, you get more-or-less identical signals on both channels for the music, but uncorrelated signals for the noise. When you listen to it, especially through headphones, the effect is disconcerting as the noise is all around, but the music is in the center.

With a mono cartridge, or a stereo cartridge wired for mono output, you get a single signal, but also, I believe, better signal to noise ratio. Now, and this is where I don't know the answer, you should be able to add two channels, divide by two, and get the same thing- more music, less noise. My question is, does "mixing" as usually implemented, do just that? (I think yes) And, is there some other process that can identify differences in a stereo recording of a mono record, and eliminate them even better?


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