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Simple Linear CRCRC PSU
Simple Linear CRCRC PSU
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Old 24th April 2020, 02:23 AM   #1
Gaz2613 is offline Gaz2613  United Kingdom
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Default Simple Linear CRCRC PSU

I have two versions of these available. The first is a single rail positive PSU and the second is a dual rail PSU providing positive and negative outputs.

I have done a full write up on the single rail board here.

The single rail PSU is ideal for building into enclosures as stand alone power supplies for headphone amps, DACs and pre-amps.

The dual rail PSU is good for building projects that require both a positive and negative supply which you can house all together in the same enclosure. For example I have had a lot of interest in this board for use with Wayne Colburns BA2018 Linestage amp which is quite fitting as after all these PSUs are based in part on the Whammy PSU. I will do a full write up on my site once I get more boards from the fab house hopefully with the correct silkscreen and no lines.

I did my own measurements too with the scope to verify the boards I made are just as effective as Wayne's original design and the readings speak for themselves.

And for anyone that says "why are you using those old noisy regulators?" I added a smoothing cap on the output of the regulator and measured the output with the scope and I can confirm the ripple is just as straight as it is on the 3rd cap in the main filter.

Excuse the lines on the dual rail PCB the fab house messed up somehow with the silkscreen when trying to draw the caps on.

I have plenty of boards so if you are interested then drop me a PM.
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Old 29th July 2020, 09:25 AM   #2
jamesfeline is offline jamesfeline  United Kingdom
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I like the layout design well done
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Old 29th July 2020, 10:44 AM   #3
Vovk Z is offline Vovk Z  Ukraine
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I am not so sure. It looks fine, but the layout could be better. The wires from resistor to resistor of CRCRC-filter have to go from resistor to capacitor pin and only then to the next resistor pin. Such a layout ensures maximum done by caps.
And I would put a RC-snubber after the primary but not just a cap (C1).
And there could be a place for a fuse or fusible resistor or NTC-resistor at the primary.

Last edited by Vovk Z; 29th July 2020 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 29th July 2020, 12:09 PM   #4
Gaz2613 is offline Gaz2613  United Kingdom
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Here is a better one I made in a smaller layout. I disagree with the path for the resistors in the CRC filter. Electricity travels so quick there is no noticeable difference between the way you mentioned and the way I have implemented it. There would even be no noticeable difference if you did point to point. If you look at the scope image you will see layout is still effective.

My new boards measures only 160mm x 100mm and slides straight into the rails of a Hammond 1455T2201 enclosure. On board fuse too for those that are fussy and don't want to use an IIEC inlet with onboard fuses.
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Old 29th July 2020, 08:37 PM   #5
Vovk Z is offline Vovk Z  Ukraine
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At 100 kHz and higher the 10mm wire has an impedance of the same order as the capacitor (so it is noticeable with appropriate test instrument). I say this because I have an oscilloscope and 5 MHz true-RMS AC microvoltmeter, so I am sure.

Last edited by Vovk Z; 29th July 2020 at 08:41 PM.
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Old 7th August 2020, 11:50 AM   #6
ruffrecords is offline ruffrecords  United Kingdom
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I notice on the web page description you say, in big letters "DC current is approx 1.414 times AC current"

Precisely what do you mean by this statement?

Cheers

Ian
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Old 7th August 2020, 12:33 PM   #7
Gaz2613 is offline Gaz2613  United Kingdom
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It means exactly that. When you convert AC to DC. For example 18v AC converted to DC is approx. 25.4V.

You simply multiply the AC voltage by 1.414.

So 18 x 1.414 gives 25.452.
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Old 7th August 2020, 12:45 PM   #8
ruffrecords is offline ruffrecords  United Kingdom
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But that is not what you said. You said "DC current is approx 1.414 times AC current" which is completely different and completely wrong.

Cheers

Ian
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Old 7th August 2020, 12:46 PM   #9
Gaz2613 is offline Gaz2613  United Kingdom
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I apologise for the misunderstanding, I meant voltage as the current stays the same. I will amend this now.

Kind regards
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Old 7th August 2020, 01:19 PM   #10
jamesfeline is offline jamesfeline  United Kingdom
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we all knew what he meant ... keep up the good work Gaz
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