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Old 6th April 2019, 08:19 AM   #1
T3GTerry is offline T3GTerry
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Default Too much power?

Ok. I have two solid state mono amps that someone gave me. New/unused. In my small shop here at home I also have a transformer from a PS Audio 100c. It appears to be a 110vac / 40-0-40 / +/-58vdc setup. HOWEVER, I want to know can I replace the bridge rect and the caps and reduce my dc voltage to use on my new mono boards? They call for a maximum of +/-45vdc @ 2.5 amp. Bottom line ........ can I use this transformer to supply these boards? The transformer has dual outputs for 2x mono amps.
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Old 6th April 2019, 08:20 AM   #2
T3GTerry is offline T3GTerry
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By the way. Those are the specs on the power supply. The actual voltages measured at idle were 44-0-44 and +/- 60 vdc.
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Old 6th April 2019, 09:48 AM   #3
FauxFrench is online now FauxFrench  France
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Originally Posted by T3GTerry View Post
By the way. Those are the specs on the power supply. The actual voltages measured at idle were 44-0-44 and +/- 60 vdc.
As such you can. The +/-60Vdc have to be converted to around 40Vdc-42Vdc. That is a lot for a linear regulator with that current. You will most likely need a Buck converter. The best would be a Buck converter (down to around 45Vdc) followed by a linear post-regulator (taking the remaining drop).

However, it may not be cheaper than buying a new transformer.

Alternatively you need a pre-transformer to reduce the primary voltage. It is less expensive than buying a new transformer.

NB: Is your net voltage (wall plugs) 110/115V or 230/240V?

Last edited by FauxFrench; 6th April 2019 at 09:56 AM.
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Old 6th April 2019, 10:05 AM   #4
BAAzar is offline BAAzar  United States
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You need a 32VAC-CT-32VAC transformer to get +/-45VDC after rectifier and filter
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Old 6th April 2019, 11:26 AM   #5
JMFahey is offline JMFahey  Argentina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T3GTerry View Post
Ok. I have two solid state mono amps that someone gave me. New/unused. In my small shop here at home I also have a transformer from a PS Audio 100c. It appears to be a 110vac / 40-0-40 / +/-58vdc setup. HOWEVER, I want to know can I replace the bridge rect and the caps and reduce my dc voltage to use on my new mono boards? They call for a maximum of +/-45vdc @ 2.5 amp. Bottom line ........ can I use this transformer to supply these boards? The transformer has dual outputs for 2x mono amps.

You can, technically, but itīs more complex/expensive than either getting a couple modules which stand higher voltage or a lower voltage rated transformer.

Not sure about your "junk box" contents but you may pull and use a transformer from any dead/abandoned/junked amplifier, say 60 to 120W per channel , which will have , say, +/- 36 to 42V rails.
Free or for a couple bucks, maybe $20 if a garage sale or Salvation Army special.

Or visit your friendly local Tech and ask for abandoned non repaired stuff.
Lots of people reject estimates, abandon stuff and buy new instead, .... donīt ask me how I know
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Old 6th April 2019, 05:57 PM   #6
T3GTerry is offline T3GTerry
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Ok no problem. I can just save this transformer for another project later on. Oh and my initial source voltage was 115vac if that helps.

thanks guys.
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Old 11th April 2019, 02:49 AM   #7
CBS240 is offline CBS240  United States
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Hi
If your transformer is over sized (in VA rating) for your project, you could buck 24 volts off of the primary using another 24V transformer secondary. Just make sure the 24V transformer can handle the primary current. Running the primary at about 88VAC should output 32-0-32.
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Last edited by CBS240; 11th April 2019 at 02:51 AM.
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