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CheapoModo: quick and dirty transformer snubber bellringer jig
CheapoModo: quick and dirty transformer snubber bellringer jig
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Old 2nd January 2019, 04:47 PM   #291
tanwa is offline tanwa  Thailand
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One question.

If I put snubber on the secondary winding, do I still need the cap across each rectifier diode? I think it like the capacitance value in the transformer secondary side which is not cover with Cheapomodo circuit. Am I understand correctly?
any suggestions?
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Old 2nd January 2019, 06:59 PM   #292
mige0 is offline mige0  Austria
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Johnson View Post
Please feel free to adjust the potentiometer on your Cheapomodo, to get whatever waveform shape you like most. No doubt you studied differential equations, Laplace Transforms, and continuous-time control systems on your way to becoming Ing. Michael Gerstgrasser, so you don't need an introductory tutorial on damped oscillation in second order systems.
No need to get any sarcastic!
And no, I'm not a degreed EE, so no need to get in "Attack is the best means of defence" mode either.
My questions - not really answered, were honest.

They were aimed towards as to why zeta=1 would be any beneficial, say opposed to over damped.
There is so little findings written here about the sonic outcome of the snubberings performed, and I for one would appreciate to get a better handle on the correlation to that.
In the end its not about carrying out an interesting scientists textbook exercise, but to possibly get a step further in terms of sound quality of (modified) audio gear, no?

So I rephrase my questions:
Are there auditioning based observations, that zeta=1 is the sweet spot to go for?

Last edited by mige0; 2nd January 2019 at 07:05 PM.
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Old 2nd January 2019, 10:18 PM   #293
Mark Johnson is offline Mark Johnson  United States
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CheapoModo: quick and dirty transformer snubber bellringer jig
I guess I misunderstood what I read when I clicked the hyperlink in your signature and visited the website "www dot kinotechnik dot edis.at/pages/diyaudio/CMPB/Audio_and_Loudspeaker_Design_Guide_Lines.html" . I saw that it was written by "Ing. Michael Gerstgrasser" and I made
two assumptions: (i) that author is you; (ii) "Ing." means you have a degree in electrical engineering. Apparently my assumptions were not correct and I apologize for the error.

The answer to your question "Why is it that we are after zeta=1 actually?" is
I recommend a target value of zeta=1.0 (so called "critical damping") because I feel it gives the greatest margin-of-safety against setup errors, measurement errors, and interpretation errors. I lump all of these together into a "beginner's mistakes" category, and I estimate that a beginner's total error can be as large as 40%. In my opinion, zeta = 1 is the target centerline which gives the least dangerous worst-case, when a beginner accidentally builds (target_zeta 40%). Zeta=1 also has the secondary benefit of being easy to estimate visually.
The answer to your question "The graph still shows overshot, no?" is: yes, there is overshoot, but there is no oscillatory ringing.

If you wish more people would post their before-and-after listening evaluations of 2C+1R transformer snubbers, that might turn out to be full of difficulty. How do you motivate or influence other people to do what you want them to do? At first sight it doesn't seem easy, but I wish you good success in the endeavor.
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Old 2nd January 2019, 10:49 PM   #294
mige0 is offline mige0  Austria
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Johnson View Post
Apparently my assumptions were not correct and I apologize for the error.
accepted


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Johnson View Post
The answer to your question "Why is it that we are after zeta=1 actually?" is
I recommend a target value of zeta=1.0 (so called "critical damping") because I feel it gives the greatest margin-of-safety against setup errors, measurement errors, and interpretation errors. I lump all of these together into a "beginner's mistakes" category, and I estimate that a beginner's total error can be as large as 40%. In my opinion, zeta = 1 is the target centerline which gives the least dangerous worst-case, when a beginner accidentally builds (target_zeta 40%). Zeta=1 also has the secondary benefit of being easy to estimate visually.
thanks, this part I got


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Johnson View Post
The answer to your question "The graph still shows overshot, no?" is: yes, there is overshoot, but there is no oscillatory ringing.
Ok, got it


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Johnson View Post
If you wish more people would post their before-and-after listening evaluations of 2C+1R transformer snubbers, that might turn out to be full of difficulty. How do you motivate or influence other people to do what you want them to do? At first sight it doesn't seem easy, but I wish you good success in the endeavor.
Well, so much raving about different capacitors making for an improvement in one way or another, same to resistors, opamps and so on, there certainly "should" come up impressions and anecdotal evidence of all sorts.
Lets wait and see then if it happens and if we possibly can filter out some further useful clues from them.

Thanks for the Qasimodo bell ringer and all the background info you provide!
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