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Old 5th February 2012, 10:21 AM   #1
sendoushi is offline sendoushi
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Join Date: Feb 2012
Default Pedal Power Supply

Hey guys!

So, I've posted a topic on DIYStompboxes but they only helped me until some point. I don't know much about electronics. I've done some stuff but still a newbie. Never worked with AC let's be fair.

Here is the thing, I want to build a power supply for my pedals.
I've been checking Spyder schem. ( http://www.geofex.com/article_folders/spyder/spyder.htm )

From what I understand, everything after the voltage regulator is always the same. So, the thing is: i'm from Portugal, my voltage goes around 230v. I want to get some fuses on the circuit so if something happens it won't mess with my pedals and stuff or at least won't destroy the rest of the circuit.
I'm thinking of making one / two 12v output, six / eight 9v and one 5v.

So and doubt is...? Fuses and transformers. I've been searching ebay for transformers that o 230v -> 12v but I don't know what kind of transformer I need for example. My best chances is to use ebay and sort of because I won't find these things around here. And fuses? How to implement them?
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Old 5th February 2012, 02:18 PM   #2
GloBug is offline GloBug  Canada
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Join Date: Jun 2011
What country to you live in? I would go dumpster diving, you should be able to find lots of ~12v transformers. Chance are lots of transformers on eBay came from the same place, unless your talking new.

Actually a 9v transformer will give you roughly 12.6vdc rectified, which might make a little less heat in the regulator(s).

I would imagine most regular sized transformers could handle the pedals.

The final value of fuse would be determined by your final circuits current needs. The fuse won't be very big. For testing purposes maybe use a 0.5A or 1A fuse, although I'm not sure how this translates to 220v, which usually uses different value fuses then those of us on 120Vac. Need some numbers and crunch the math.
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Old 5th February 2012, 02:25 PM   #3
sendoushi is offline sendoushi
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Join Date: Feb 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by GloBug View Post
What country to you live in? I would go dumpster diving, you should be able to find lots of ~12v transformers. Chance are lots of transformers on eBay came from the same place, unless your talking new.

Actually a 9v transformer will give you roughly 12.6vdc rectified, which might make a little less heat in the regulator(s).

I would imagine most regular sized transformers could handle the pedals.

The final value of fuse would be determined by your final circuits current needs. The fuse won't be very big. For testing purposes maybe use a 0.5A or 1A fuse, although I'm not sure how this translates to 220v, which usually uses different value fuses then those of us on 120Vac. Need some numbers and crunch the math.
Portugal. There aren't much dumpsters around unfortunately. I'm even searching for antique items shop so I can get an old radio or something and it isn't being easy. There are some weekly fairs that have some antiques. Maybe one of these days i'll go to one of those and see what i find.

Still... I have some old broken monitors and scanners and stuff laying around so I can open them up. Maybe I will find something interesting I don't know. My fear is the AC thing. Never worked with it, don't know anything about it. I don't know how a transformer for what i want looks for example eheh...

Anyway... can you later help me with the "math"?
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Old 5th February 2012, 02:35 PM   #4
GloBug is offline GloBug  Canada
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Join Date: Jun 2011
First things first, read up on how to identify and safely discharge capacitors. These can hold a charge even after the device is unplugged, this is very important. Pretty much every A/C device will have these.

There is no rush, if you don't feel 100% confident, wait until you do.

The math can be sorted out later, you need a transformer with the right voltage and current handling. I would think any average sized transformer could handle a couple of pedals.

Just about everything has a transformer in it, you will find something, it does not need to be an antique, in fact newer might be better anyways.
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Old 5th February 2012, 02:38 PM   #5
sendoushi is offline sendoushi
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Join Date: Feb 2012
Antique is just another thing I want, for cases and stuff. Of course I don't want antique transformers. There is no sense on that.

I'll check for that then.
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Old 5th February 2012, 10:02 PM   #6
sendoushi is offline sendoushi
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Join Date: Feb 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by GloBug View Post
First things first, read up on how to identify and safely discharge capacitors. These can hold a charge even after the device is unplugged, this is very important. Pretty much every A/C device will have these.

There is no rush, if you don't feel 100% confident, wait until you do.

The math can be sorted out later, you need a transformer with the right voltage and current handling. I would think any average sized transformer could handle a couple of pedals.

Just about everything has a transformer in it, you will find something, it does not need to be an antique, in fact newer might be better anyways.
Just so I can understand these things a bit more and things like that... http://www.ebay.es/itm/1W-Transforme...ht_2291wt_1086 is this what I want? Of course I would need to have like 10 of those but is that it?
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