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Old 23rd January 2009, 11:56 AM   #21
MJ Dijkstra is offline MJ Dijkstra  Netherlands
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Quote:
Originally posted by arend-jan
Picture of a ES100 (taken from http://www.nacl.de/esl/ google image search is your friend)

From the looks of it, the circuit diagram seems to be correct.

Follow the wire up and down and you will see the schematic circuit is wrong. Remember there are two identical stators glued exactly on each other which may be confusing as we have to look to just a single stator.

It is intuitive to think that the different stator sections are parallel connected like the schematic shows and a fast glimp to the stator doesn't give a clue at first sight. But following the wire (which is easiest with a real audiostatic, you will find no split-up but a series connection within the single stator, thus in series.
Anyone with an audiostatic should be able to confirm this. Just unscrew the 3 screws at the back, remove the cover, and you will see the wires running upwards/downwards alternately:

1) the stator starts in the middle at the right of the high frequency section (correctly: full range), up and down you will move from the right to the left. Than:
2) a resistor (several in series) is connected from the high frequency section to the left of the left bass section.
3) running up and down it goes from left to right untill it meets the high section again; no it is bridged to the right bass section, the wire moves up and down from left to right again.

This can be seen from the photo as well, but is difficult to separate the different wires on the photo.
I hope there are some more owners of an audiostatic confirming this.
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Old 23rd January 2009, 12:23 PM   #22
jam is offline jam  United States
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MJ,

I have owned a pair of 100's which I had extensively modified, To the best of my knowledge the schematic is correct. Only the middle of the stator get tn full signal off the transformer. The portions left and right of the stator are (HF) are attenuated to prevent the panel beaming.

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Jam
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Old 23rd January 2009, 01:08 PM   #23
MJ Dijkstra is offline MJ Dijkstra  Netherlands
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Quote:
Originally posted by jam
MJ,

I have owned a pair of 100's which I had extensively modified, To the best of my knowledge the schematic is correct. Only the middle of the stator get tn full signal off the transformer. The portions left and right of the stator are (HF) are attenuated to prevent the panel beaming.

Regards,

Jam

The middle gets the full signal indeed, but after leaving the middle part the signal is led through a resistor which is a crossover indeed. It removes the high frequency part above say 3,5 kHz.
The incorrect schematic will operate similar although the stator is fed parallel instead of series. Please note the 'split-up' in the upper part of the schematic. You won't find this split-up in your audiostatic, each stator is fed along a SINGLE wire which doesn't split-up afterwards. See my previous mail.
I invite you to unscrew the back of your esl and take a very good look.

edit: .... have owned......seems that you no longer own this esl?!!,
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Old 23rd January 2009, 05:45 PM   #24
Calvin is offline Calvin  Germany
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Hi,

to be precise You´re right MJ. But the middle HT-strip consists of just a few meters of copper wire. The resistance of this length of wire is of no importance and I regarded it as "0-Ohm-resistor", or at least negligible. It wouldn´t make any difference to connect the outer strips immediately via the 47k-resistors as it is sketched in the schematic. In practise this would mean just a tiny bit of more handywork.

jauu
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Old 24th January 2009, 03:02 PM   #25
MJ Dijkstra is offline MJ Dijkstra  Netherlands
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Quote:
Originally posted by Calvin
Hi,

to be precise You´re right MJ.
jauu
Calvin

That's what I wanted to read

In a single step segmentation (without a resistor before the high section) it would probably not make any difference indeed.
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Old 24th January 2009, 03:23 PM   #26
jam is offline jam  United States
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Hi MJ,

I sold my Audiostatics a few years ago. I now own Soundlabs. I wish I had a pair to disect but maybe the person I sold them to will let me...................but I think Calvin has cleared it up.

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Jam
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Old 24th January 2009, 05:23 PM   #27
bear is offline bear
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MJ,

Electrically it makes no difference if the resistors come off the end of the stator wire from the center, or direct from the feed wire to the first stator section (center section)... yeah you do get whatever the internal resistance of the stator wire is, but probably that is negligable. Ok, perhaps there is some mysterious capacitive effect that further rolls off the highs... someone would have to verify that by testing an actual panel and switching the connection point and seeing if the freq response changes.

Ok on this?

Now, does anyone who has had an Audiostatic diaphragm out of the panel notice what the coating *might* be?? Is it graphite or something more exotic?

_-_-bear
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Old 27th January 2009, 07:12 PM   #28
JonasKarud is offline JonasKarud  Sweden
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The schematic from SDS Lab is correct. Believe me, I've restored
12 pairs of Audiostatics. The membrane coating on those speakers have been graphite powder polished into the 12u membrane surface. The membranes have been glued to the distances with, as far as I've been able to see, ordinary double sided office tape and silicon.
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Old 27th January 2009, 08:06 PM   #29
MJ Dijkstra is offline MJ Dijkstra  Netherlands
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Quote:
Originally posted by JonasKarud
The schematic from SDS Lab is correct. Believe me, I've restored
12 pairs of Audiostatics. The membrane coating on those speakers have been graphite powder polished into the 12u membrane surface. The membranes have been glued to the distances with, as far as I've been able to see, ordinary double sided office tape and silicon.

- I can't see any split-up within a stator, see my previous mail, so schematic is incorrect, just look carefully.

- there is no graphite powder coating on audiostatic; they are transparant from origin, but as dirt attaches to the membrane, it becomes dark. There are some low resistance black coloured 'loops' around the perimeter within the older designs.

- 12 micron? I have had different thickness of Mylar between my fingers and the film of audiostatic is definately not 12 micron. It is more like 6 micron which was confirmed by the author of a dutch esl-book. (all ES models)

- the double sided tape and silicon is correct
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Old 27th January 2009, 10:53 PM   #30
JonasKarud is offline JonasKarud  Sweden
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Sorry, but the schematic at http://www.nacl.de/esl/ is correct!

The left side of the left package the 47 k resistors are connected to the bass stator wires at the extreme left and the right side of this resistor package is connected to the full range wires and to the drive transformer. The transformer signal a.k.a runs directly to the middle full range wires and also trough the left resistor package over to the extreme left of the wires. These wires run up and down a number of times. After the last run down, the wire is not clued to the distance, instead it is lifted and soldered to the right bass stator wires, bridging the eight full range wires in the middle. Exactly as the schematic shows.

Most of the speakers I've restored were the big ES300 model and I can send you a old piece of an Audiostatic membrane to show that it is indeed 12u, measured with micrometer, and graphitized.
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