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Old 15th November 2018, 04:05 PM   #11
TungstenAudio is offline TungstenAudio  United States
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Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Kenmore, WA
Quote:
Originally Posted by generg View Post
My B1 sounded with two 9V blocks lovely.
When I went to my Jazz friends to give the B1 a try, I connected instead a Wall ward supply hoping to get the still better sound for this evening.
It sounded bad and nobody liked it, a few days later I came back with the batteries and they loved the sound.

So the the wall ward supplies seem to be different.

:--))

Wall 'wart' power supplies are indeed quite different from linear supplies, and from each other. BTW, I use the term wall wart to indicate the blocks that plug directly into the wall outlet. They look like warts growing out of the wall.

Pretty much all wall warts these days are SMPS type, designed with cost as the primary consideration. Many are very poor at preventing the switching frequency from leaking onto the output, or even back onto the AC line. On the other hand, brick style SMPS power supplies that plug into the wall with a separate power cord can be quite good. The brick SMPS supplies used with the ACA, both the earlier 19V laptop power adapter and the newer 24V Meanwell bricks supplied with the ACA kits, have been shown to be capable of very good audio performance.

When using SMPS bricks of unknown quality for my guitar pedals, I have taken the precaution of providing some extra filtering between the PSU and the pedals. I made an inductor using 20 ga magnet wire wrapped around a 1/2 inch dowel, with four separate tap points, equally spaced. At each tap point I connected a 220 uF, 25V capacitor. Inductance between taps is approximately 5 uH. Ground returns for each power outlet were separately wired back to the input ground.

Some of my pedals are more sensitive to power supply noise than others, and this little contraption has proven to be effective at quieting the noise. It has the added benefit of providing the correct polarity for typical pedal power connectors. Picture is attached. Something like this could be cleverly hidden inside the B1 chassis to use with an external SMPS brick.
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Old 15th November 2018, 08:02 PM   #12
budwiser is offline budwiser  United States
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Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: dark side of the moon
I'm using an Energizer xp8000 to power the B1 Not sure its available anymore.

Last edited by budwiser; 15th November 2018 at 08:05 PM.
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Old 15th November 2018, 08:11 PM   #13
Paully is offline Paully  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by TungstenAudio View Post
Wall 'wart' power supplies are indeed quite different from linear supplies, and from each other. BTW, I use the term wall wart to indicate the blocks that plug directly into the wall outlet. They look like warts growing out of the wall.

Pretty much all wall warts these days are SMPS type, designed with cost as the primary consideration. Many are very poor at preventing the switching frequency from leaking onto the output, or even back onto the AC line. On the other hand, brick style SMPS power supplies that plug into the wall with a separate power cord can be quite good. The brick SMPS supplies used with the ACA, both the earlier 19V laptop power adapter and the newer 24V Meanwell bricks supplied with the ACA kits, have been shown to be capable of very good audio performance.

When using SMPS bricks of unknown quality for my guitar pedals, I have taken the precaution of providing some extra filtering between the PSU and the pedals. I made an inductor using 20 ga magnet wire wrapped around a 1/2 inch dowel, with four separate tap points, equally spaced. At each tap point I connected a 220 uF, 25V capacitor. Inductance between taps is approximately 5 uH. Ground returns for each power outlet were separately wired back to the input ground.

Some of my pedals are more sensitive to power supply noise than others, and this little contraption has proven to be effective at quieting the noise. It has the added benefit of providing the correct polarity for typical pedal power connectors. Picture is attached. Something like this could be cleverly hidden inside the B1 chassis to use with an external SMPS brick.
I am unfamiliar with ACA but I think I know what you are talking about with the brick style power cords that have the adapter in the middle and two cords going out, one to the wall and the other to something like a laptop. Seems like I had a Dell that had that type of connection. Might have a power cord downstairs to try or I can go searching. Going to start with simple 9V batteries and then try your idea. Thanks!

Last edited by Paully; 15th November 2018 at 08:14 PM.
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Old 15th November 2018, 08:14 PM   #14
Paully is offline Paully  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by generg View Post
My B1 sounded with two 9V blocks lovely.
When I went to my Jazz friends to give the B1 a try, I connected instead a Wall ward supply hoping to get the still better sound for this evening.
It sounded bad and nobody liked it, a few days later I came back with the batteries and they loved the sound.

So the the wall ward supplies seem to be different.

:--))
I think I will try two 9V batteries to start and then look for some sort of power supply to mess around with. Like I noted above try the 9Vs, then a brick style cord with the "wall wart" in the middle, then maybe try building a real power supply town the road if I feel the need.

And to everyone who has responded, I want to say thanks. A Lot of great ideas that I need to consider once I actually do get this built and have tried the 9V batteries. The board is on the way so I should be able to build it in a few weeks.
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