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Power Resistor Inductance Measurements
Power Resistor Inductance Measurements
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Old 24th April 2013, 11:43 PM   #11
davidsrsb is offline davidsrsb  Malaysia
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The only place in audio that resistor inductance is significant is the very low value emitter resistor in a power amplifier output stage. In that special case the inductance is often beneficial.
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Old 25th April 2013, 12:23 AM   #12
Mark Johnson is offline Mark Johnson  United States
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Power Resistor Inductance Measurements
Another place in audio that resistor inductance is significant, is loudspeaker crossover networks.
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Old 25th April 2013, 02:48 AM   #13
Conrad Hoffman is offline Conrad Hoffman  United States
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IMO people worry too much about resistor inductance. The only time it might matter is if you used ww resistors in the feedback network of an opamp or power amp with a lot of bandwidth, an unlikely place to use a ww.
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Old 25th April 2013, 05:53 AM   #14
davidsrsb is offline davidsrsb  Malaysia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by transistormarkj View Post
Another place in audio that resistor inductance is significant, is loudspeaker crossover networks.
Values used in crossover networks are usually between 1R (tweeter L-pads) and about 22R (shunt RC across woofer)
This range does not require too many turns and hence has small values of inductance (10s of uH), that just will not be significant at 20kHz
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Old 16th September 2019, 07:06 AM   #15
ThetaII is offline ThetaII  United Kingdom
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Originally Posted by davidsrsb View Post
Values used in crossover networks are usually between 1R (tweeter L-pads) and about 22R (shunt RC across woofer)
This range does not require too many turns and hence has small values of inductance (10s of uH), that just will not be significant at 20kHz
Maybe yes, in comparison to other factors in the system affecting the overall sound but I have been comparing different makes/types of resistors (and paralleled to the same value) for a couple of years and found that each type and make do have an affect on the sound - whether in a shunt, L-Pad or just in series.

I expect a lot of people will jump on this now and say 'where are your measurements?' - I have made some but I don't think the inductance value is the only factor and the real proof is in the listening. There is more at play than just pure inductance. The materials design and contrustion of a resistor type affects the sound - it does in my system at least.

The resistors I have been comparing are all modestly priced - std white ceramics, metal film/oxides, 5W carbon film (tweeter filter only), Ohmite Audio Gold, Jantzen Superes and Mills MRA.

I would say that some resistors will suit a particular design (or position within a crossover), where maybe another resistor (type or make) will suit another. I hear the differences - maybe these differences are not so clear in a different system, but they are there.

My favourites for use in crossovers are the Ohmite Audio Gold for the quality to cost ratio but they don't necessarily suit all situations. Unfortunately I could not afford to compare the Dueland or Path Audio ranges.

For those who disbelieve, I am happy for you to visit me in the Midlands, UK, and I will demonstrate the differences - my crossovers are external on a board (not covered at present) so easy to swap out components. PM me if interested.

Last edited by ThetaII; 16th September 2019 at 07:19 AM.
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Old 16th September 2019, 08:33 AM   #16
AllenB is offline AllenB  Australia
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Resistor types have different Voltage coefficients. The resistance changes slightly depending on the Voltage across the resistor. This may create odd-order harmonic distortion in a crossover, and sometimes even orders in an amp.
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Old 16th September 2019, 08:52 AM   #17
johnego is online now johnego  Indonesia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThetaII View Post
I expect a lot of people will jump on this now and say 'where are your measurements?'

Yes. Few resistor threads were closed and supporters were bullied by the unbelievers . Very unfortunate. A resistor can make or break a great sounding system. But I also cringed when the supporters are supporting $$$ resistors. The true test of listening ability is that you can find cheap resistor that will outperform a lot of $$$ resistors. You know it because you can hear it, not because it is expensive (which will have some perceivable advantages of course).
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Old 16th September 2019, 04:00 PM   #18
ThetaII is offline ThetaII  United Kingdom
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I would like opinions on why a lot of people say carbon film caps are a no no in crossovers though. I have tried the Kiwame 5W carbon films in the L Pad parallel position for the HF and don't hear any adverse issues.

They appear to open the sound a bit (that's just my opinion of their affect in my system before anyone jumps down my throat).
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Old 16th September 2019, 04:24 PM   #19
Conrad Hoffman is offline Conrad Hoffman  United States
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You might find this interesting-
Power Resistor Distortion
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Old 16th September 2019, 04:26 PM   #20
johnego is online now johnego  Indonesia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThetaII View Post
I would like opinions on why a lot of people say carbon film caps are a no no in crossovers though. I have tried the Kiwame 5W carbon films in the L Pad parallel position for the HF and don't hear any adverse issues.

They appear to open the sound a bit (that's just my opinion of their affect in my system before anyone jumps down my throat).
I have never heard people say carbon film resistor is a nono. I have used it for crossover too. Allen-Bradley is also my preferred resistor for output emitter resistor. It is not to be used in feedback and almost anywhere else in an amp.
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