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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

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Old 30th August 2002, 05:16 PM   #11
Bill Fitzpatrick is offline Bill Fitzpatrick  United States
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Much depends on the dimensions of the pieces.

Sometimes a table saw is best, other times a radial arm saw is best. I do not believe you will succeed with a router. You really have to be good to do it with a Skil saw.

If it's a full miter box you have 12 edges to perfectly line up. Every single cut must be dead on. In addition, if you are going to use biscuits (or a spline which is preferable for a larger box) all those cuts must match up as well.

And then there is the problem of assembly.

Without the proper tools adjusted perfectly and a lot of patience, you will be at your wits end.

Butt joints with a spline or biscuits would be easier. You could then use MDF and veneer it. Veneering is a lot easier than mitering and you have a tremendous choice of woods.
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Old 30th August 2002, 06:37 PM   #12
jackinnj is offline jackinnj  United States
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Default Given up on biscuits

There was an article in Fine Woodworking 3 or 4 issues ago which concluded that biscuits aren't as strong as everyone had thought. They help a lot in the alignment of cabinetry, and unless you are going to stand on the speakers, are probably a good idea in this application. Again, however, a good biscuit cutter costs a couple hundred bucks.
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Old 30th August 2002, 08:55 PM   #13
haldor is offline haldor  United States
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I've got the little picture frame biscuit machine (can't remember the brand name at the moment). This machine is cool because it will work even on really small pieces of wood (where you really need the extra help holding things straight) and the joint strength is impressive, comparable to dowels.

I even use it for some general jointery when working in hard woods (doubt if there would be enough material for MDF), you just use a couple of extra biscuit if worried about strength.

My small biscuit machine cost about $70 US.

Phil
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Old 30th August 2002, 10:41 PM   #14
fragman56 is offline fragman56
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Default woodworking

If you use a table or radial arm saw, test the blade angle on some scraps first because it is rare to get the cut right the first time.

I assume you have a carpenter's square. Cut two pieces of scrap and dry fit together (anyway you can--hot glue). Put the test joint in a carpenter's square and see how close the joint is to 90 degrees. Adjust blade angle.

I would suggest butt joints with veneer though.

Rick
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Old 31st August 2002, 02:14 AM   #15
slicemaster101 is offline slicemaster101  United States
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Default not a good idea...

A 45 is a bad idea. First off it is very, very hard to do well. If this is your first project and you are not experienced working with wood I suggest that you use a butt joint. It is really easy and if you are painting or veneering the sucker it will never show, plus this type of joint is much stronger and more forgiving if you make a mistake. I am a very experienced wood worker with probably $20,000-40,000 worth of the best tools you can buy, and even I have had problems getting a 45 Perfect. It takes lots of time and unless you are using a fine wood witch you are going to stain stick with a butt joint. If you are painting it I can give you tips on how to make those seems disappear.

Good luck,
Slice
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Old 31st August 2002, 01:22 PM   #16
Pete Mazz is offline Pete Mazz
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Actually, a mitered corner is one of the strongest joints using MDF.

For speaker enclosures, a butt joint is more than strong enough if cut properly. Much, much easier to get a good strong joint.

Pete
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Old 2nd September 2002, 01:35 AM   #17
jackinnj is offline jackinnj  United States
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Default Is a 45 degree mitre stronger?

The surface area of a 45 degree mitre is about 40% greater than a butt joint, but I wonder, if you look at the way in which the force is distributed whether the strength is really proportionate to the surface area. At any rate, butt joint or mitre joint use battens made of 1 X 1 pine and you will have a very strong carcase!

Did I ever tell you about the time I built a pair of TL speakers using particle board as a form for concrete? Tamped down there were no voids, and no vibration either. They also couldn't be moved! As I feared that one of the kids would push them onto a younger sibling I broke them apart with a sledge-hammer! Too bad, very nice walnut veneer.
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Old 2nd September 2002, 10:22 AM   #18
navin is offline navin  India
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i prefer tounge in groove. the stronger the better. then brace it to make it indestructible.
:-)

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Old 4th September 2002, 03:09 PM   #19
Schaef is offline Schaef  United States
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Default my thoughts

I have to agree with the numerous other posts discouraging the miter corners. Especially if what you're planning to use to cut them with is a dremel. First, you'll kill that poor machine, and secondly, you'll never get the joint perfect. (Or even really close for that matter) Since this is your first project, and you don't have a lot of woodworking resources, definately stick with the butt joint. It'll be stronger than you think! (For those who don't know/understand what a butt joint is, its simply taking one board and gluing it to the edge of a second board. Two straight cuts, very easy to do)

As for looking professional, butt joints are used all the time by professionals! If you're talking about how speakers look, what you're seeing is a veneer over the MDF put on after construction. (No, those beautiful walnut/oak/paduak speaker cabinets are not solid walnut/oak/paduak, they're veneers!!!)(

Okay, now to help the arguments about biscuits and joint strength. It has been shown that biscuits do not add much strength to the joint. They do, however, aid in aligning the joints. As to joint strength, if you're using a decent wood glue (Tightbond is a decent one) the glue is stronger than the wood!

My recommendations to the person building the boxes, go with a simple butt joint, making sure your cuts are straight, you'll have no problems whatsoever with strength of the joints.
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Old 5th September 2002, 04:55 AM   #20
navin is offline navin  India
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what about adding lead to the cabinets or between layers? is this recomended. I was thinkingof lead shet 3mm thick.

cheers
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