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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Quick win: My Tweeters are too quiet!
Quick win: My Tweeters are too quiet!
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Old 24th November 2020, 09:15 AM   #81
Qts is offline Qts
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I think tweeter schematics is like this. Parts are C3, R5 and L4. There is no resistor to adjust level. Resistor makes something like this.
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Old 24th November 2020, 09:37 AM   #82
oldspkrguy is offline oldspkrguy  United States
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Like I said earlier; I rarely need to make accurate measurements for myself; I do almost ALL tweaking and fine tuning by ear. I was an Engineer and Technician but also a Musician. Those of us trained in music have what I consider an advantage in that we can "USUALLY" tell when the tonal balance is just right. In my case; the top octave and a half (starting around 8 KHz or so) needs to be increased so doing a measurement here for me in my listening space has very little meaning. Having said all of this; I do "sometimes" have to make accurate measurements just like most people do.

Even Vance Dickason remarks about art vs math and science some place in LDC. I can't remember exactly how he put it but personal taste means more to me than a ruler flat response. This is one reason I have each driver pair on it's own stereo amplifier; fine tuning! Besides, some recordings are overly bright, some dull, some have way too much bass, others; not enough...and so on...

[I'm excited once again; I have a new Crown amp on the way for the woofers. This will be a great advantage as it has built in DSP. I have a prominent room mode at about 40 Hz and THAT is very hard to fine tune. My sub has active bass management and now so will my lower woofers. I should be able to flatten out the low bass; the DSP has LP or HP or band pass with 1/12 th octave center freq.]...

Cheers!
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Old 24th November 2020, 09:45 AM   #83
SONDEKNZ is offline SONDEKNZ  New Zealand
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Quote:
oldspkrguy said "Those of us trained in music have what I consider an advantage in that we can "USUALLY" tell when the tonal balance is just right. In my case; the top octave and a half (starting around 8 KHz or so) needs to be increased so doing a measurement here for me in my listening space has very little meaning..."
Well said! I could not agree more.
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Old 24th November 2020, 05:56 PM   #84
markbakk is offline markbakk  Netherlands
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Well, there is hifi and there is myfi. Both are perfectly legitimate.
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Old 24th November 2020, 06:04 PM   #85
oldspkrguy is offline oldspkrguy  United States
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I asked a pro sound guy once how he does it. It uses a RTA to set for flat response FIRST; THEN he fine tunes each and every venue he does by ear! Recording Engineers do the same thing; they trust their hearing. Musicians and other musically trained people tend to agree here as well.

I have a measurement system; and can and do use it from time to time. The science and math are real for sure but my idea is the whole point of DIY is to be able to tailor your sound to your tastes and liking.

Yes, all of these techniques are valid; there is more than one "right" answer.
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Old 24th November 2020, 06:12 PM   #86
weltersys is offline weltersys  United States
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Originally Posted by SONDEKNZ View Post
I was curious to see in your little diagram that you have inserted a [quality] +/- 1uF capacitor to bypass BOTH the Resistor and the current Capacitor in one leap, in this arrangement.

Was this intentional?

I assume this helps pass through any high frequencies that might have [possibly] been limited by the first cap...?
The placement was intentional, the smaller capacitor would bypass the resistor attenuation and provide a very high frequency boost equal to the reduction in level the resistor provides. The result is a HF shelf with the corner frequency determined by the capacitor, the smaller the capacitor, the higher the shelf frequency.

This would give you a shade more VHF tweeter, with no more of the lower portion of the tweeter.

Art
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Old 24th November 2020, 06:17 PM   #87
oldspkrguy is offline oldspkrguy  United States
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Yes, that is a neat trick. I bypass inductors with resistors sometimes to make a more shallow rolloff in a LP. Not for BSC but to give a little more upper response to a mid or mid-woofer that may be on the dull side.

Using Caps on resistors is a similar kind of thing.
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