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Best compound to dampen enclosure?
Best compound to dampen enclosure?
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Old 18th October 2020, 01:03 PM   #1
3wayaddict is online now 3wayaddict  Netherlands
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Default Best compound to dampen enclosure?

Hello,

I'll be building a new set of cabinets, the same as my last set but they weren't didn't fit as tightly together as I would've liked. So I'll be building another pair which will then be veneered and finished by Boesch who usually renovate and finish classic Rivas.

When I was putting together my previous pair and I was fitting the Silent Coat butyl damping sheets I noticed that it didn't actually make that much of a difference at all when I gave a knock on the wooden panels. Do you know at wat sort of frequencies butyl damping is most effective? And what are the most effective damping compound to fit in different chambers of the speaker? What would be most effective in a bass cabinet (20 - 300 Hz) and what would be most effective in midrange chamber (300 - 3.000 Hz)?

Would like to hear your suggestions.
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Old 18th October 2020, 01:50 PM   #2
sq225917 is offline sq225917  United Kingdom
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What are cabs made from, whats the internal bracing layout, what size is each box
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Old 18th October 2020, 02:16 PM   #3
Remlab is offline Remlab  United States
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A knuckle test is almost totally unaffected by what you apply to the inside of a cabinet unless the wood is extremely thin(think sheet metal). On the other hand, bracing techniques will have a very large effect on wood panels of typical thicknesses. Damping sheets do have an effect though. They help keep acoustic noise vibrations in the volume of the cabinet from transferring into the cabinet walls. Look at it this way, if you apply the sheets on the entire outside of the cabinets and do a knock test, it will have a very clear effect. That's what its doing for the inside of the cabinets.
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Last edited by Remlab; 18th October 2020 at 02:32 PM.
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Old 18th October 2020, 07:55 PM   #4
chebum is offline chebum  Poland
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60 pounds on top of cabinet reduce vibrations a lot. This approach allows to keep the cabinet light and transportable.
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Old 18th October 2020, 11:55 PM   #5
bradleypnw is offline bradleypnw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chebum View Post
60 pounds on top of cabinet reduce vibrations a lot. This approach allows to keep the cabinet light and transportable.
Creative solution.
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Old 19th October 2020, 07:46 AM   #6
markbakk is offline markbakk  Netherlands
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Constrained layer damping (CLD) is most effective. As is decoupling driver chassis. As is reducing cabinet volume (less area is less radiation). And did I mention bracing?

The simple approach would be to get some Kuiperdecibel. Or use the mass plates from Akoestiekwinkel.nl and glue them between sheets of 8mm ply.
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Old 19th October 2020, 09:26 AM   #7
celef is offline celef
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Remlab View Post
A knuckle test is almost totally unaffected by what you apply to the inside of a cabinet unless the wood is extremely thin(think sheet metal).
I think the layer you apply to the inside must be dimensioned to the outer layer, i don not think it will only be effective with thin layers

Quote:
On the other hand, bracing techniques will have a very large effect on wood panels of typical thicknesses.
i find bracing to work only around the area where it is attached, non braced areas are still hollow sounding

Quote:
Damping sheets do have an effect though. They help keep acoustic noise vibrations in the volume of the cabinet from transferring into the cabinet walls. Look at it this way, if you apply the sheets on the entire outside of the cabinets and do a knock test, it will have a very clear effect. That's what its doing for the inside of the cabinets.
is this not a bit like cheating, like using a soft foam knuckle compared to a real knuckle, they will of course give different results but the panel has not changed its resonance character
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Old 19th October 2020, 11:06 AM   #8
3wayaddict is online now 3wayaddict  Netherlands
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Well let's focus on the midrange chamber. Damping the walls of the bass chamber won't be necessary. The bass chamber is extremely well braced and rigid and it doesn't resonate at all in the first place because of the force canceling arrangement of the woofers.

I'm primarilly looking to dampen all the walls of the midrange chamber. Everything is constructed out of 25 mm HDF. There is a horizontal brace to reinforce the side walls. Of course there will be cutouts, it's just very simplified in the picture. It is shown with the cutouts on another picture. There will also be a vertical brace to reinforce the top and bottom walls, which isn't shown on the picture. So together they will form a cross in the middle of the chamber. The side walls are about 210 mm high, the bottom wall is 250 mm wide and the top wall is 147 mm wide.
So it's really quite well braced and rigid though it still sounds kinda hollow when giving it a knock, which I'd like to dampen.
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Old 19th October 2020, 02:20 PM   #9
markbakk is offline markbakk  Netherlands
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Well, that leaves out a few options. I sure would try mounting the midrange 'floating', to reduce vibration transmission from frame to enclosure panels. The panels likely will have quite high resonant frequencies considering the sizes, thickness and material. I guess somewhere around 1kHz. When you are able to create a flexible mounting with fr quite low, say about a few 100Hz and some damping, transmission loss to the panels wil be high.

Of course adding damping sheets will bring reduction of resonances too, but less than the flexible mounting will bring you.
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Old 19th October 2020, 02:49 PM   #10
hifijim is offline hifijim  United States
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Here is an interesting thread that dives deep into your question

A Monster Construction Methods Shootout Thread

Bottom line is that Weicon 310M Flex Classic works pretty good, it is not expensive, and it should be widely available in Europe (German company I think).
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