Go Back   Home > Forums > >
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Blogs Gallery Wiki Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Why do we use "smooth" as a description for speakers?
Why do we use "smooth" as a description for speakers?
Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 19th March 2020, 07:26 PM   #1
Flaxxer is offline Flaxxer  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Albion, CA
Default Why do we use "smooth" as a description for speakers?

  • Not being able to hear many of the speakers I am curious about, I will often message someone and ask them for their opinion of what their own speakers sound like. Although I know they will be biased, I find it interesting the word smooth seems to be used most often as the 1st words to describe their speakers. No one likes to hear edgy sounding speakers, but music is usually dynamic more than smooth . So when we refer to our speakers as smooth and easy to listen to, does that mean that we don't find extremely revealing, dynamic, and engaging speakers , also to be good designs?

    What would a person do if they didn't want only smooth, but also dynamic and revealing as well? Cant really high efficiency Pro designs, with extreme dynamics also be smooth? And why don't you ever hear a person describing speakers as, "can play really loud, yet still won't fatigue your ears after listening". Wouldn't that be a more impressive feat of design, and way of describing speakers?
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th March 2020, 09:21 PM   #2
eriksquires is offline eriksquires  United States
diyAudio Member
 
eriksquires's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
When I used that term it's about the frequency response.

Smoothness in this sense is something I'm very sensitive to. Lots of speakers have peaks and valleys, sometimes contributing to the signature sound.

What is called "revealing" is often having a ragged response, accentuating some notes, and damping others. This "unmasks" (and I use the term related to hearing and perception) certain notes, making you feel the speaker now shows you things you never heard before.

Then, there is smooth, but bright. Magico S1 is one of those in my book. Better than average speaker for low level listening.
__________________
All of my successes and failures can be explained by my attempts at getting a girlfriend. All of them.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th March 2020, 09:34 PM   #3
cogitech is offline cogitech  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
cogitech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Kamloops, BC
Why do we use "smooth" as a description for speakers?
To me, it only means that the speaker isn't "shouty" or "shrill" and is therefore more pleasant sounding. For some people it might even mean a rolled off top end - not overly bright, that's for sure.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th March 2020, 10:09 PM   #4
DMLBES is offline DMLBES
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Smooth means its not harsh sounding even when listening at higher volume levels. Which in turn usually means less fatigue when listening to music for prolong periods of time. A speaker can still be revealing, dynamic and engaging and still sound smooth.

I hear only good things about GR Research's (Danny Richie's) speakers sounding really good and smooth. He even has informative videos on youtube.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th March 2020, 10:39 PM   #5
Pharos is offline Pharos  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Seaford
I think that the limitations of the ear in analysing what is going on, plus the difficulty of describing subjective perceptions with any rigour make things very difficult.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th March 2020, 12:34 AM   #6
Douglas Blake is offline Douglas Blake  Canada
Account Closed
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Niagara Region Ontario
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pharos View Post
I think that the limitations of the ear in analysing what is going on, plus the difficulty of describing subjective perceptions with any rigour make things very difficult.
That sentence will get you nominated for the understatement of the year award.

There is quite simply no way to tell someone what you are hearing without common frames of reference.

Last edited by Douglas Blake; 20th March 2020 at 12:51 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th March 2020, 01:15 AM   #7
Discopete is offline Discopete  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Why do we use "smooth" as a description for speakers?
Smooth is a very poor descriptor imo. These responses affirm it. It could mean anything. It has no tangible points of reference attached to it except pure imagination. I hate seeing it. It means nothing. There are plenty of good descriptors to define the sound of a speaker, even a standardized table of them precisely explained for those who want to carry on an informed conversation. Again, in audio, this word is meaningless.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th March 2020, 01:27 AM   #8
Pano is offline Pano  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
Pano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: SW Florida
Why do we use "smooth" as a description for speakers?
Smooth means a lot to me, so I don't find it useless.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th March 2020, 01:42 AM   #9
Discopete is offline Discopete  Canada
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Why do we use "smooth" as a description for speakers?
I find Patron tequila 'smooth'. I always drank it straight. Delicious. Gibson's 12 year old, again, smooth. A car body ready for paint, again, smooth.


Speaker sound signature, smooth? Huh?
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th March 2020, 01:52 AM   #10
system7 is offline system7  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
system7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Portsmouth UK
Smooth, to me, is Louis Armstrong.

Combine him with 007 James Bond and our own National Treasure Diana Rigg, and you have the epitome of SMOOTH.

YouTube

The best Bond movie, IMO. Bit of a tearjerker.
__________________
Best Regards from Steve in Portsmouth, UK. Sea Temperature 16.2C. May 27 baseline 15.4C.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Why do we use "smooth" as a description for speakers?Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What makes an amplifier "bright", "warm", or "neutral"? JohnS Solid State 51 13th December 2009 06:42 PM
70cm tall, 3 way, diy speakers based on 10"/4"/1" japanese ken brown drivers. facundonu Multi-Way 34 9th March 2009 04:59 AM
12" "guitar" driver in Audio Speakers jwhit67 Multi-Way 4 11th February 2008 02:47 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:34 AM.


Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 14.29%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2020 diyAudio
Wiki