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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Benefits of minimal baffle
Benefits of minimal baffle
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Old 14th January 2020, 04:48 PM   #21
waxx is offline waxx  Belgium
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I listened to a lot of speakers, and those i like all have wide baffles and large boxes. It's not scientific at all, but as this is a constant factor in wich speakers i like, i tend to use that in my speakerbuilds. I've red all kind of theories of both camps of this discussion (wide vs small baffle), and see no real consensus or scientific proof that "the other" is wrong, so i think it's a case of what you prefer, both have advantages and disadvantages.

But i prefer wide baffles, so that is what i build...
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Old 14th January 2020, 04:49 PM   #22
jcandy is offline jcandy  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cspieker View Post
Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence, as they say. What is the quality and quantity of evidence supporting the opposite take, ie:wide baffle better? Thanks for the insight and opinion, I find it fascinating.
The ratio folklore to fact on this subject is enormous. There seems to be little solid evidence for either side of the debate. I started out accepting the common wisdom that narrow baffles are superior (this is the more common position). Then, in attempting to develop a flagship product for a small company, we were slowly drawn over a number of years (iteration to iteration) to the wide-baffle camp.

An interesting experiment is to attend an audio show, listen to 20 or 30 small-footprint speakers, and then listen to something like the Voxativ Ampeggio Due.
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Old 14th January 2020, 05:15 PM   #23
maty tinman is offline maty tinman  Spain
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottjoplin View Post
How would a large baffle covered with felt, to mitigate edge diffraction, compare?
Today, Fine Tuning?

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Put the felt or high density foam around the tweeter. I used foam on my old Von Schweikert VR2 speakers because that is what I had. It made a big difference.
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Old 14th January 2020, 05:28 PM   #24
hifijim is online now hifijim  United States
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I have enjoyed and admired both large and small baffle speakers, but yes there is a certain quality that stems from the baffle size. Large baffle speakers have a common sonic fingerprint that somehow transcends the easily measured qualities of frequency response and horizontal dispersion. The same is true for small baffle speakers.

What I hear with large baffle speakers is a more realistic presentation of sound from about 100 Hz to 400 Hz. Male voice, piano, electric guitar and bass, and the larger brass and woodwind instruments (trombone, baritone sax) seem more immediate and real. I have no idea why this perception exists even among speakers with very different tonal balances.

Most small baffle speakers seem to disappear more easily when I close my eyes. They seem more 3 dimensional. I use to think that this was a by-product of the fact that small narrow speakers were easier to place in the ideal location within the room, but I think it goes beyond that... even when placed in a non-optimum location, they still seem to create a believable 3 dimensional sonic illusion.

Obviously we all have preferences in what we value most in reproduced sound. I also believe we differ in how we perceive sound particularly music. Further, we all live in different rooms, and our speaker choices are heavily influenced by the room in which we live.
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Old 14th January 2020, 05:40 PM   #25
hifijim is online now hifijim  United States
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Covering the baffle with heavy felt or foam can have a positive benefit, if the tonal balance is adjusted... i.e. you will loose a little HF response with a felt/foam baffle (maybe 1 db more or less), so if you adjust the response of the tweeter up appropriately, you will probably find an improvement. Vandersteen and Wilson have used this technique for decades.

I have never heard a convincing theory for why felt/foam covered baffles would make the kind of improvement that we hear. The "first cut" analysis would predict no real benefit, yet that is not what most people hear.
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Old 14th January 2020, 05:51 PM   #26
puppet is offline puppet  United States
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My understanding is as the speaker baffle gets smaller, the greater the difference in off axis sound level, between lows and highs, becomes.
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Old 14th January 2020, 08:33 PM   #27
adason is offline adason  United States
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can you provide evidence for that statement?
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Old 14th January 2020, 10:26 PM   #28
puppet is offline puppet  United States
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hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Sound/diffrac.html



Hope that link works.

Last edited by puppet; 14th January 2020 at 10:32 PM.
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Old 14th January 2020, 10:59 PM   #29
adason is offline adason  United States
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That would explain better imaging...

I always thrive for uniform off axis response. It's my experience that speakers with abrupt changes in off axis do not sound natural.
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Old 15th January 2020, 12:39 PM   #30
celef is offline celef
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to me, that example in that link looked more like driver beaming effect then baffle size effect.

try the ripple tank applet, it is fun to use. add a wall and place the sound source at it. try different sizes and increase the freq

Ripple Tank Simulation
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