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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Benefits of minimal baffle
Benefits of minimal baffle
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Old 13th January 2020, 05:54 PM   #11
cspieker is offline cspieker  United States
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Many people believe that a narrower baffle speaker images better than a wide baffle speaker. I share that belief, and believe that they tend to disappear as sound sources more readily, but I'm only 50% sure it's not all in my head.
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Old 13th January 2020, 06:47 PM   #12
picowallspeaker is offline picowallspeaker  Italy
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I don't fully realize what "image" or "imaging" does mean, but, yes, having a minimal baffle but /AND an aerodinamyc profile/form helps in making the box more invisible to the re-radiated sound. "image" being less blurry or with single light just one shadow!
Also same for radar and Stealth jet fighters...
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Old 13th January 2020, 11:50 PM   #13
jcandy is offline jcandy  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolox View Post
I usually prefer speakers with a LARGE baffle and a lot of wood around drivers; they seem to be more "meaty" and effortless. My belief is that the skinny front baffle fashion is just to help with WAF; any claim of better sound I find very dubious.
I completely agree with this.
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Old 14th January 2020, 01:28 AM   #14
adason is offline adason  United States
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I completely disagree with this.
As it was documented by vandersteen speakers, siegfried linkwitz (rip), john kreskovsky's nao note speakers and many others...including me.
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Old 14th January 2020, 06:07 AM   #15
jcandy is offline jcandy  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adason View Post
I completely disagree with this.
As it was documented by vandersteen speakers, siegfried linkwitz (rip), john kreskovsky's nao note speakers and many others...including me.
I know very well that opinions on the narrow-versus-wide-baffle debate differ. Yet, in all that I have read, I can find little to nothing persuasive. I don't think I could list a single peer-reviewed article that sheds light on the question which ultimately comes down to a subjective preference for one diffracted spectrum over another. The answer to this open question may be a strong function of on-axis tuning, or room characteristics, or something else. What has been "documented" is, in my experience, somewhere between educated opinion (at best) and self-serving nonsense (typically).

And for the record, I probably qualify as an "expert":

AES Journal Forum >> Accurate Calculation of Radiation and Diffraction from Loudspeaker Enclosures at Low Frequency
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Old 14th January 2020, 07:14 AM   #16
revisorn is offline revisorn  Sweden
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With baffles there are some considerations to make:

1) chamfering the edges spreads out (in time) the soundreflection from the edges (as shown in the earlier graph),
2) unequal distance to edges (from the driver) spreads out the soundreflection and will affext the frequency curve less (if done right),
3) Baffle diffraction, The size of the baffle will determine what baffle support the bass will get from the baffle, the smaller baffle - the less support.

To test the planned baffles effect on the frequency curve there is a nice peice of software:

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Old 14th January 2020, 08:59 AM   #17
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
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How would a large baffle covered with felt, to mitigate edge diffraction, compare?
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Old 14th January 2020, 03:22 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottjoplin View Post
How would a large baffle covered with felt, to mitigate edge diffraction, compare?
the damping properties of the felt are affected by the incoming angle of the sound wave, in this case it would have minor impact if any at all
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Old 14th January 2020, 03:30 PM   #19
celef is offline celef
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i think it is best to look at the power response of the loudspeaker, the size of the baffle should be choosen to get the best total system response. but a narrow baffle may be more inert and therefor have some sonic advantages
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Old 14th January 2020, 03:31 PM   #20
cspieker is offline cspieker  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcandy View Post
I know very well that opinions on the narrow-versus-wide-baffle debate differ. Yet, in all that I have read, I can find little to nothing persuasive. I don't think I could list a single peer-reviewed article that sheds light on the question which ultimately comes down to a subjective preference for one diffracted spectrum over another. The answer to this open question may be a strong function of on-axis tuning, or room characteristics, or something else. What has been "documented" is, in my experience, somewhere between educated opinion (at best) and self-serving nonsense (typically).

And for the record, I probably qualify as an "expert":

AES Journal Forum >> Accurate Calculation of Radiation and Diffraction from Loudspeaker Enclosures at Low Frequency

Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence, as they say. What is the quality and quantity of evidence supporting the opposite take, ie:wide baffle better? Thanks for the insight and opinion, I find it fascinating.
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