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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Crossover? Woofer? Test method?
Crossover? Woofer? Test method?
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Old 29th July 2019, 10:43 PM   #1
Kustomize123 is offline Kustomize123
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Default Crossover? Woofer? Test method?

I have 3 questions if someone could help me out please!

1. I have driven some 5" speakers full range, without subs, at loud volumes. The Za5, to be exact. Not knowing what it would do, and still not sure if it has done anything. Is there a method/way to confirm if all the drivers (ZA5 Woofers) are working as they are supposed to be working? I don't hear anything wrong in the sound, but I just wonder if there is a test to do? I have UMIK-1 if it matters.

2. I had some families over, one of the kids (dont even know who), decided to dent both the tweeters (they are metal - titanium tweeters by Vifa). So obviously they'd need replacement aswell, am I right to assume that? I have pulled the dents out using tape, but they are not perfect and still have some small dents here and there.

3. Same as question 1, is there a test or a way to check if my crossover parts are all working fine? I got them assembled from madisound, so I am not saying they are not correctly connected, I am just asking is there a way to check if each component is working as it should be?
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Old 30th July 2019, 12:41 AM   #2
Galu is offline Galu  Scotland
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1. The obvious and simplest way to test if a speaker is working correctly is to listen to it. By your own admission it would appear the speakers are alright!

2. You have done the right thing by pulling the dents out. You are unlikely to hear any difference in the treble reproduction.

3. Same as in answer 1, the simplest way to test a crossover is to attach speakers and play some music. Newly acquired crossover components are extremely unlikely to be faulty unless a gross overload has occurred, but this would also show up on listening.

I think you may be worrying needlessly. I would simply be upset about the visual damage to the tweeters which always act as magnets to childrens' fingers!
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Old 30th July 2019, 10:00 AM   #3
Kustomize123 is offline Kustomize123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Galu View Post
1. The obvious and simplest way to test if a speaker is working correctly is to listen to it. By your own admission it would appear the speakers are alright!

2. You have done the right thing by pulling the dents out. You are unlikely to hear any difference in the treble reproduction.

3. Same as in answer 1, the simplest way to test a crossover is to attach speakers and play some music. Newly acquired crossover components are extremely unlikely to be faulty unless a gross overload has occurred, but this would also show up on listening.

I think you may be worrying needlessly. I would simply be upset about the visual damage to the tweeters which always act as magnets to childrens' fingers!
Thankyou for you response!

My listening is what worries me! I am a total noob as of right now, being new to the hobby. I dont trust my ears! That is the sole reason I ask, if there is a way to confirm all of this?

Glad to know my tweeters won't need replacement other than for cosmetic reasons!
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Old 30th July 2019, 01:47 PM   #4
AllenB is offline AllenB  Australia
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Crossover resistors and inductors are likely to show damage connected with overheating. This should be obvious in their colour and smell. Electrolytic capacitors may show swelling around their vents. Woofer voice coils may rub/scrape when you (carefully) push the cone. The voice coil resistance might measure low with a meter.

Normally though, not much to go wrong.
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Old 30th July 2019, 06:16 PM   #5
Galu is offline Galu  Scotland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kustomize123 View Post
My listening is what worries me! I am . . . new to the hobby.
The more fortunate participants in this hobby find inner contentment through concentrating on the music.

The less fortunate ones spend their time concentrating on the potential failings of their equipment!
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Old 30th July 2019, 08:20 PM   #6
Kustomize123 is offline Kustomize123
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I took a few measurements, 0.5 meter tweeter axis.

Smoothed 1/12
Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.

While the frequency response does seem different like the dip around 5k, the distortion graphs for both the left and right is whats weird for me, any guesses?

Last edited by Kustomize123; 30th July 2019 at 08:26 PM.
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Old 30th July 2019, 09:28 PM   #7
Kustomize123 is offline Kustomize123
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Adding on, 2 of the Woofers DO make a little rubbing noise, scraping noise type. One on each side. Now is there a further test to check this for sure?
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Old 31st July 2019, 12:24 AM   #8
AllenB is offline AllenB  Australia
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The red and green plots are probably sufficiently similar to indicate no problems.

When checking for rubbing it is easy to push the cone off-centre, or you could deform the coil into an oval using two fingers
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Old 31st July 2019, 01:23 AM   #9
Galu is offline Galu  Scotland
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Push the cone down very gently and evenly using two fingers, one on either side of the dustcap at the centre of the cone.

Using just one finger may, as AllenB says, push the cone off-centre and cause scraping to be heard when, in fact, the speaker is OK.

Another way to test would be to feed a continuous 50Hz tone into the speaker and listen for any scraping/buzzing noise.
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Old 31st July 2019, 07:39 AM   #10
Kustomize123 is offline Kustomize123
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Both of you are absolutely correct!

When I pushed from the center of BOTH sides of the dust cap, it seemed to not make any such noise.

I was doing it with one hand only before.

Good tip!!!

Thankyou guys!

Lastly, I just want to know, why is the distortion rising after about 5k in both my distortion graphs?
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