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HF1440 New Ring Compression Driver from Faital Pro.
HF1440 New Ring Compression Driver from Faital Pro.
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Old 10th April 2019, 08:34 PM   #1
ScottG is offline ScottG  United States
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Default HF1440 New Ring Compression Driver from Faital Pro.

FaitalPRO | HF Drivers | HF1440


-generally I'm not fond of ring-types at freq.s nearing their resonance. I find they are often lacking in the depth perspective.

Still, other than the pain-in-the-@ss Impedance - it's a nice looking driver, with excellent high-freq. extension for a 1.4" exit driver. Flux density is particularly high: should be very detailed (subjectively) as a result.

Might make for an excellent 1st order driver after correction (near 1.8-2 kHz). Of course this would require a horn loaded midrange, and both horns would need to be angled for a good integration window (vertically).
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Old 11th April 2019, 09:12 AM   #2
ErnieM is online now ErnieM  United States
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The press release claims a lot of time was spent refining low frequency behavior. Wonder how it compares to other large format drivers down low. The high frequency is very smooth compared to most.

I was looking at 4" diaphragm compression drivers for a project but then this showed up last week for PL+S. Looks like many are going to ring-radiators for their flagship products.

Although comments on a comparison between the 950PB-Be and Axi2050 makes me pause for a bit. The person claimed that the 950 had noticeably higher resolution despite being matched very closely in frequency response and level.
On another forum someone has a JBL 2452H-SL ranked slightly ahead of the D2 for their preferences.

Maybe it has something to do with a large piston moving very little vs. small section of a ring trying to make the same spl....I don't know.

Guess I need to try both.
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Old 11th April 2019, 01:07 PM   #3
phase_accurate is offline phase_accurate
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It looks quite promising. Wonder how much it will cost and when it will be available.

Regards

Charles
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Old 11th April 2019, 07:31 PM   #4
etalon90 is offline etalon90  Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ErnieM View Post
The press release claims a lot of time was spent refining low frequency behavior. Wonder how it compares to other large format drivers down low. The high frequency is very smooth compared to most.

I was looking at 4" diaphragm compression drivers for a project but then this showed up last week for PL+S. Looks like many are going to ring-radiators for their flagship products.

Although comments on a comparison between the 950PB-Be and Axi2050 makes me pause for a bit. The person claimed that the 950 had noticeably higher resolution despite being matched very closely in frequency response and level.
On another forum someone has a JBL 2452H-SL ranked slightly ahead of the D2 for their preferences.

Maybe it has something to do with a large piston moving very little vs. small section of a ring trying to make the same spl....I don't know.

Guess I need to try both.
Tend to agree here, In my VERY limited sample and experience, I favoured dome over ring radiator every time Ive used my ears.
(and both had DSP applied on same horn profile)
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Old 11th April 2019, 07:32 PM   #5
ScottG is offline ScottG  United States
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Just press-released, so it could be a month or so before it's offered from retailers.

My guess is that it will be somewhere between the 144 and 140 in price, or about $260-335 with maybe an initial price-bump from that range for "early-release".
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Old 11th April 2019, 08:08 PM   #6
ErnieM is online now ErnieM  United States
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Originally Posted by etalon90 View Post
Tend to agree here, In my VERY limited sample and experience, I favoured dome over ring radiator every time Ive used my ears.
(and both had DSP applied on same horn profile)
Interesting. Thanks for sharing.

I expect the HF1440 to be between $500-700 based on what the HF1400/2000 costs. Hopefully not.

Last edited by ErnieM; 11th April 2019 at 08:11 PM.
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Old 11th April 2019, 08:08 PM   #7
ScottG is offline ScottG  United States
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Originally Posted by ErnieM View Post

Maybe it has something to do with a large piston moving very little vs. small section of a ring trying to make the same spl....I don't know.
Actually the ring-type in this instance is usually larger than typical compression driver: extending well beyond the diameter of the VC (..see BMS photo). At the same time though, the surface area is reduced at the center of the driver relative to a typical compression driver.

This makes it rather like a radial planar (see 2nd pic.), particularly with respect to how it's "clamped" at the edges of the diaphragm, and the resulting distortion profile that's generated from that sort of design (..typically with higher even-order artifacts in general - especially as you move toward resonance.)

(..of course the VC is radically different between the two, the planar's VC is etched to the surface of the diaphragm.)

The biggest (excursion) limit to a standard compression driver is the phase-plug - hitting it: as it's usually designed to be very close to the diaphragm. Ring-types though are limited by the diaphragm itself, and often the phase-path isn't at all a limit.


Integration in the design will be critical to get the best "HiFi" from it. It has that lower freq. extension - which is very useful,

-BUT

using that lower freq. extension very near the average (even though horn-loaded), could well end-up with a sound that is a bit "flat".

Again, to me this is not a driver I'd push lower in freq. for a crossover.. BUT it is one that suggests a low-order high-pass filter while having an extended upper freq. response. This makes it reasonably unique. If I were doing something more traditional (often with a super-tweeter to cover the top-octave), I'd look to the 18 Sound ND 1460A or ND 1480A ..


It's also interesting to note that BMS doesn't have anything quite like this design. All of their larger VC designs (that extend near 20 kHz w/ 3.5" VC) are coaxial units. This one from Faital Pro isn't.
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File Type: jpg prd100.jpg (93.4 KB, 845 views)
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Last edited by ScottG; 11th April 2019 at 08:12 PM.
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Old 11th April 2019, 08:10 PM   #8
ScottG is offline ScottG  United States
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Originally Posted by ErnieM View Post
Interesting. Thanks for sharing.

I expect the HF1440 to be between $500-700 based on what the HF1400/2000 costs.
-if it's that (and your guess could well be correct), then they have priced themselves out of the market: with plenty of viable alternative-solutions.
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Old 12th April 2019, 01:28 AM   #9
ErnieM is online now ErnieM  United States
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Originally Posted by ScottG View Post

This makes it rather like a radial planar (see 2nd pic.), particularly with respect to how it's "clamped" at the edges of the diaphragm, and the resulting distortion profile that's generated from that sort of design (..typically with higher even-order artifacts in general - especially as you move toward resonance.)

(..of course the VC is radically different between the two, the planar's VC is etched to the surface of the diaphragm.)

The biggest (excursion) limit to a standard compression driver is the phase-plug - hitting it: as it's usually designed to be very close to the diaphragm. Ring-types though are limited by the diaphragm itself, and often the phase-path isn't at all a limit.
These facts are what have me wondering. A ring radiator has the highest excursion at the voice coil with less towards the clamp (obviously). While a dome is moving the same distance along it's entire area until breakup occurs.

In the case of the Axi2050 vs. 950PB-Be, you have a 5" ring radiator with 1mm xmax against a 4" dome with maybe 0.25mm clearance. If I remember correctly, the entire ring isn't contributing to the high frequency output like a dome is.

I would imagine this would be detrimental to high frequency clarity at higher volumes compared to the large 4" be dome (when crossed in the dome's comfort range). The ring will have much more output down low but maybe at a cost to high frequency dynamics and detail.

How good are The Jubilees today? - Page 35 - Technical/Modifications - The Klipsch Audio Community

How good are The Jubilees today? - Page 35 - Technical/Modifications - The Klipsch Audio Community

This is splitting hairs for most people. Still, I find it interesting that there's not one design that totally out classes the other despite being newer and using the latest software available. Always a compromise.
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Old 12th April 2019, 09:55 PM   #10
LineSource is offline LineSource  United States
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Faital Followers.... are there any hints of Faital developing a coaxial compression driver using the HF1440 as the midrange, which could challenge the BMS 4594NE, B&C DCX 464? i.e. adding a high frequency coaxial ring radiator driver into the HF1440 chassis.
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