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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Ribbon Unity Horn
Ribbon Unity Horn
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Old 7th October 2018, 11:56 PM   #1
Patrick Bateman is offline Patrick Bateman  United States
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Default Ribbon Unity Horn

Though I love to tinker on car projects, I largely don't do home speakers because I'm really terrible at finishing things, and I'm really terrible at making speakers that look "presentable."

That's why I bought a pair of Gedlee Summas about ten years ago, and then replaced those with a set of Vandersteens when I moved to San Diego. (My wife banished the Summas to the garage, because our home was tiny.)

A month ago I managed to buy a house that's humongous, so I finally have an opportunity to put some horns back in the home theater. This project will be my attempt to do that.
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Old 8th October 2018, 12:43 AM   #2
Patrick Bateman is offline Patrick Bateman  United States
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Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Here's what the speaker is going to look like. I'm terrible at making speakers look "presentable", so my idea was to use a sonotube. By using a sonotube, all I need to do is make two cuts. I honestly have a hard time making a wood cube, I'm just not "detail oriented" and one or two of my cuts are always 'off' by a bit, making my boxes look terrible.
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Old 8th October 2018, 01:20 AM   #3
Patrick Bateman is offline Patrick Bateman  United States
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I was kinda inspired by the Infinity Prelude. I bought a set of these off Craigslist, tried to restore them, and failed. So my thought is that I may be able to re-use the woofers that I bought to repair the Infinity. ( Restoring Infinity Preludes )

Click the image to open in full size.

Here's a side view of the 3D printed waveguide. This is only half finished, that's why it's leaning backwards.

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Here's a front view of the 3D printed waveguide. This is only half finished.

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Here's a top view of the 3D printed waveguide. Again, half finished.
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Old 8th October 2018, 05:30 AM   #4
fotsinijts is offline fotsinijts
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Waveguide looks nice! I'm wondering if the mid slots aren't causing too much hf interference (or what's the correct term) because of their size and placement?

What will be the crossoverpoints?
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Old 9th October 2018, 12:21 AM   #5
Patrick Bateman is offline Patrick Bateman  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fotsinijts View Post
Waveguide looks nice! I'm wondering if the mid slots aren't causing too much hf interference (or what's the correct term) because of their size and placement?

What will be the crossoverpoints?
I've tinkered with every type of midrange tap you can imagine:

3) frustums, like the Danley SH-50

2) cylinders, like the SPL Unity Horns

1) full-on phase plugs, like an actual compression driver

Click the image to open in full size.

Personally, I've found that midrange taps shaped like an L'Acoustic DOSC work better than anything else. Basically the DOSC shape expands like a cone, but then the shape is "truncated" into a ribbon like exit.

Why is this a good thing?

It's good because it gives you a shape that's *slightly* expanding, but ends up being ribbon shaped. This is good for a couple of reasons:

1) Because this midrange tap is expanding, it reduces reflections back down the throat, aka "higher order modes."

2) Because the exit of this midrange tap is ribbon shaped, it doesn't screw with the response of the tweeter a whole lot. Picture the tweeter wavefront radiating across the waveguide surface, and it (briefly) diffracts across the midrange taps, but not for long.

As I see it, a ribbon shaped midrange tap is about as good as it gets.

Here's some proof:

Click the image to open in full size.
This is the midrange response of my Unity horn, with three of six woofers playing.

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This is the tweeter response of my Unity horn, with a 2khz highpass on the ribbon tweeter.

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Here's the response of both.

The combined response isn't perfectly smooth, but it's pretty darn good, especially considering that the waveguide is way smaller than ideal, and it has six midrange taps!
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Old 9th October 2018, 05:35 AM   #6
fotsinijts is offline fotsinijts
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That's surprisingly! I've been working on a small footprint multiple entry (os) waveguid which ofcourse can't be the ideal size but the midrande taps are something I'm still not sure about.

Which midranges are you using btw?

I draw my stuff in Autocad but you mind sharing your file?
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Old 9th October 2018, 02:48 PM   #7
Jack Arnott is offline Jack Arnott  United States
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This is awesome. Are you going to mount the woofers in a similar style cutout?
Do you need six kids to match the sensitivity of the horn loaded tweeter, or are they needed to fill the footprint around the tweeter?
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Old 9th October 2018, 03:26 PM   #8
marco_gea is offline marco_gea  Italy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Bateman View Post

Click the image to open in full size.
This is the midrange response of my Unity horn, with three of six woofers playing.
This actually looks pretty awful to me. What are you going to do with those humongous peaks at 5kHz+?
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Old 9th October 2018, 05:56 PM   #9
Jack Arnott is offline Jack Arnott  United States
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This is the mid band sweep, he is going to cross it over, and have the tweeter cover this range.
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Old 9th October 2018, 06:06 PM   #10
Jack Arnott is offline Jack Arnott  United States
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mids, not kids
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