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Multi-Way Conventional loudspeakers with crossovers

Looking for a euphoric mid-range driver - polymer driver?
Looking for a euphoric mid-range driver - polymer driver?
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Old 27th September 2018, 02:56 PM   #11
Mario Pankov is offline Mario Pankov  Europe
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Looking for a euphoric mid-range driver - polymer driver?
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieLaub View Post
HINT: it's not the cone material that is resulting in the severely colored reproduction from a particular loudspeaker!
Believe me, it can contribute a lot.

To the author - find a midrange that has high 2nd order distortion and low odd order distortion, then stick it in an overly damped enclosure. Ideal would be a cheap treated paper cone driver with a soft dust cap or a vintage unit. You may like the Visaton FRS8 in that regard.

Last edited by Mario Pankov; 27th September 2018 at 02:59 PM.
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Old 27th September 2018, 03:49 PM   #12
eriksquires is offline eriksquires  United States
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Call me selfish, but I don't want my driver to be giddy.

I like the SS cut paper line, but they're more warm than euphonic.
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Old 27th September 2018, 03:52 PM   #13
ErnieM is offline ErnieM  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stretchneck View Post

.....rich, 'wet', creamy and non-fatiguing mid range.
You got to warm them up first. Massage the cones a bit. Ramp up the power slowly then really crank the wick up on 'er.....what are we talking about again?

Last edited by ErnieM; 27th September 2018 at 03:55 PM.
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Old 27th September 2018, 03:53 PM   #14
Boden is offline Boden  Netherlands
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Quote: In general terms, polymer diaphragms have excellent internal damping (benign break-up), but poor stiffness (loss of detail).


@Marco Gea: care to quantify or clarify the statement above? What the heck is loss of detail and how do we measure that?



BTW: I am all with Charlie Laub: it is not the cone, it is the system design.



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Old 28th September 2018, 08:17 AM   #15
stretchneck is offline stretchneck  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mario Pankov View Post
Believe me, it can contribute a lot.

To the author - find a midrange that has high 2nd order distortion and low odd order distortion, then stick it in an overly damped enclosure. Ideal would be a cheap treated paper cone driver with a soft dust cap or a vintage unit. You may like the Visaton FRS8 in that regard.
This is useful - thanks. To everyone replying, yes I appreciate that a large amount of the sound that I am trying to describe is reliant upon system design. Having said that Spendor and Harbeth do use polymer mid-ranges, so there must be good reason for this - my question was not about system design, it's about drivers. Since the sound I like is that of Spendor and Harbeth and they use polymer drivers, then this is a place to start.

With regards to my terminology, 'Wet' is the only way I can think of describing the opposite of a 'dry' sounding speaker. I found some chat about how this could be interpreted here. It can be a struggle to describe the characteristics of a speaker. Perhaps when I say 'Wet' I also mean smooth, natural, lack of brittleness as well - something I associate with Spendor and Harbeth mid-ranges.

Last edited by stretchneck; 28th September 2018 at 08:19 AM.
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Old 28th September 2018, 08:59 AM   #16
adason is offline adason  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stretchneck View Post
Hi,

I'm pretty familiar with the properties of paper, kevlar, Alu and ceramic drivers - but how would a polymer driver compare? Any articles / links people can share?

My favorite mid range drivers are Spendor D series ('EP77' Polymer) and Harbeth which is also polymer I believe.

Which manufacturers are good for polymer mid range drivers?

I'm trying to avoid a dry sound, whilst maintaining a decent amount of detail - I am assuming that the acoustic properties and suspension of the driver will affect this. Just like Harbeth include for some reverberation in their cabinets, I think this might also be useful to me to have more of a rich, 'wet', creamy and non-fatiguing mid range.

Thanks
Try aurum cantus ac130f1.
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Old 28th September 2018, 09:01 AM   #17
adason is offline adason  United States
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Aurum cantus
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Old 28th September 2018, 09:27 AM   #18
Juhazi is offline Juhazi  Finland
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I noticed that using acoustic LR2 crossover topology for mid-tweeter gave more natural, perhaps even wet sound than LR4. Shallow slopes require a well behaving midrange, cone resonance is the key. Polycones usually shine in this aspect.

In my 3-ways I have Audax HM100, which looks a lot like the Aurum Cantus that adason linked. Try it!
Click the image to open in full size.
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Old 28th September 2018, 09:44 AM   #19
jtgofish is offline jtgofish
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Dynavox make some drivers that strongly resemble some of the classic Dynaudio drivers.
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Old 28th September 2018, 09:57 AM   #20
stretchneck is offline stretchneck  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Juhazi View Post
I noticed that using acoustic LR2 crossover topology for mid-tweeter gave more natural, perhaps even wet sound than LR4. Shallow slopes require a well behaving midrange, cone resonance is the key. Polycones usually shine in this aspect.

In my 3-ways I have Audax HM100, which looks a lot like the Aurum Cantus that adason linked. Try it!
Click the image to open in full size.
Thanks - very useful
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