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Curved sided speaker enclosures, why?
Curved sided speaker enclosures, why?
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Old 10th February 2009, 12:47 PM   #51
cirrus18 is offline cirrus18  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally posted by robbo266317
You need to consider the enclosure as though it's a bicycle pump.
At low frequencies all you are doing is compressing and expanding the air inside. So the enclosure tries to expand and contract like a balloon and, if the panels aren't rigid enough, it will introduce unwanted sound into the room.
With all the talk here of neutrinos and God knows what else here I have been at a loss to understand what everybody has been getting on about.
At last, a very simple and easy to understand analogy. Thank you
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Old 10th February 2009, 03:21 PM   #52
Peter M. is offline Peter M.  Norway
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Some years ago I met one of the guys behind the B&W nautilus 801.

He shoved us wide band measurements of different enclosure shapes with and without stuffing. A sphere had the strongest resonance, a cube was allmost as bad, rectangular box had more resonances but lower in level. The differences between them was alot smaller when the boxes were stuffed.


He also showed measurements of the 801 enclosure, without stuffing it it had more resonances than the sphere, but much lower in level, it wasn`t as good as the stuffed rectangular box but not bad. With stuffing the resonances was lower in level than all the other boxes.

The magnet cover in the 801 is part of the design, to reduce reflected sound coming back out thru the membrane.
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Old 10th February 2009, 04:26 PM   #53
Wavebourn is offline Wavebourn  United States
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Curved sided speaker enclosures, why?
Here is my ultimate speaker: composite material containing portland cement, curved surfaces, uneven thickness of walls.

http://wavebourn.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=21995#p21995


Couple of decades ago I made spherical speakers in spherical clay pots. They resonated horribly, even stuffed. Then I made spherical speakers of newspaper pulp with PVA glue, on big plastic balls. They were uneven, end ex-wife called them "Dinosaur's Eggs".

The problem is not only in resonances. All deformations of all materials are non-linear. That causes extra distortions on resonant frequencies.
Now, why best speakers I ever heard are those made of composite material with portland cement mixed with particles of very different shapes and densities?
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Old 6th August 2019, 07:30 PM   #54
donkeytrousers is offline donkeytrousers  United Kingdom
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Hi Cirrus 18. In sound-reducing sealed double glazed units, the "air space" is sometimes filled with a gas to help reduce sound transmission. However, the way these units are most effective is by unsing panes of different thicknesses and using laminated glass (a glass/pvb/glass sandwich which sometimes has several layers, different thicknesses, to make best use of the pvb). The air gap itself is only a small part of a complex unit.

Last edited by donkeytrousers; 6th August 2019 at 07:33 PM.
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Old 6th August 2019, 10:28 PM   #55
daemonsgr is offline daemonsgr  United Kingdom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donkeytrousers View Post
Hi Cirrus 18. In sound-reducing sealed double glazed units, the "air space" is sometimes filled with a gas to help reduce sound transmission. However, the way these units are most effective is by unsing panes of different thicknesses and using laminated glass (a glass/pvb/glass sandwich which sometimes has several layers, different thicknesses, to make best use of the pvb). The air gap itself is only a small part of a complex unit.
10 year anniversary post??

btw interesting thread! as Im designing a full curved bass bin. Ill mill (CNC) it.] inside and out.
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Old 14th August 2019, 12:17 AM   #56
iheaka71 is offline iheaka71  United States
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Default Curved speakers

Quote:
Originally Posted by cirrus18 View Post
Thanks guys for the replies. It looks like curved is the way to go. It's a win-win situation. Less moans from the other-half about great big monstrosities in the lounge and better acoustic performance.

Curved, here I come.
Hello,
Did you make the curved speakers? If you did, how are they?


Alex
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