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Old 19th February 2019, 09:22 AM   #11
dotneck335 is offline dotneck335  United States
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Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
The attached photo shows a 2x8 guitar cab I made a few years ago from an IKEA solid-pine item of children's furniture they called a RAST. -Gnobuddy
Looks pretty nice!! What speakers did you put in it?
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Old 19th February 2019, 12:03 PM   #12
knockbill is offline knockbill  United States
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Totally agree,,, the new wood is much less dense then the salvaged stuff I build with,,, may have to glue a few planks together for width, but its solid and very stable... Even modern plywood is not as good as it used to be,,, nail it down when you buy it or it warps!!! I have a pair of Walnut speaker cabinets in my L/R that I built in HS shop class 1965, that are still straight and stable... so wood quality has decreased a lot in 50 years!!!

There is a lot of old wood around here, from rehab projects,,, may have to cut around nail holes and such, but for guitar size boxes, you can usually salvage enough to use,,,
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Old 19th February 2019, 12:45 PM   #13
shanx is offline shanx  Canada
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I think it's great to reuse and re-purpose salvaged wood especially for musical instruments and cabinetry. There's a guitar builder who turns old discarded skateboard decks into beautiful electric guitars. He mentioned in an article that the wood used in many skateboards is actually laminated hardrock maple.
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Old 19th February 2019, 01:16 PM   #14
thoglette is offline thoglette  Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnobuddy View Post
I note that, during the last five years or so, IKEA Canada seems to have dropped all - or at least most - of the solid-pine items that used to be in their catalogue. The replacement products are either made of bamboo shreds glued together with plastic, sawdust glued together with plastic, or very fine sawdust glued together with plastic.

The attached photo shows a 2x8 guitar cab I made a few years ago from an IKEA solid-pine item of children's furniture they called a RAST.
I can get RAST here, but it's made short of bits of pine glued together. Not solid. But not MDF either.b
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Old 19th February 2019, 05:24 PM   #15
Gnobuddy is offline Gnobuddy  Canada
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Originally Posted by dotneck335 View Post
Looks pretty nice!! What speakers did you put in it?
Thanks, knotty pine can be very pretty! The cab has grown rubber feet and a chrome handle (Home Depot drawer-pull!) since that photo was taken.

I've been experimenting with cheap speakers to see if I can find one that sounds good with e-guitar. The cab currently has one of these, except it was sold under a different brand name, and without the 70V line transformer, so it cost even less: 8" Ceiling Speaker with 70V Transformer for Background Music and Paging

The second speaker is one of these: GRS 8FR-8 Full-Range 8" Speaker Pioneer Type B20FU20-51FW

The first of the two sounds pretty good for many things, and I like it quite a bit. Bass is a bit lacking, and it wants some treble boost in the amp for the best sound.

The GRS is a bit of a dud as an electric guitar speaker. Bass is better, true, but mids and treble are lacking, and the speaker is less sensitive. It works okay for clean tones with some treble boost in the amp, but it's not a particularly enjoyable speaker to listen to.

All our beloved guitar speakers have most of the same physical characteristics as the primitive speakers from the era when amplifiers were low powered, and tweeters and crossover networks were too exotic for home use. The surround is made from (stiff) corrugated paper, the light paper cone is thin and floppy and breaks up at high frequencies, the voice coil is short for maximum sensitivity (and so overdrives easily).

Most halfway decent contemporary speakers are not made like that. But even now, cheap-n-nasty paging / P.A. speakers are still made the same way they made them in 1950 or 1960, except the largest size they come in now seems to be 8".

That's why I've been trying out these types of cheap paging / P.A. / full-range speakers. They have all the sonic characteristics we expect from our expensive guitar speakers, except for the big built-in treble boost from, say, 500 Hz to 3.5 kHz. Power handling is just a few watts, but that is actually a positive for me - you get some cone breakup at a watt or two of power, when SPLs are still somewhat reasonable.

(I think I may have just found a relatively cheap 8" speaker that has the built-in treble boost, too. More on that later, if it works out and is worth sharing.)


-Gnobuddy
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Old 19th February 2019, 05:39 PM   #16
Gnobuddy is offline Gnobuddy  Canada
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Originally Posted by thoglette View Post
I can get RAST here, but it's made short of bits of pine glued together. Not solid. But not MDF either.
In North America, glued together strips of wood are still called "solid", thanks to all those people with marketing degrees and flexible consciences.

I first noticed this with acoustic guitar tops: clearly two pieces of wood glued together along the guitar's centreline, but everybody has been trained to call it a "solid spruce top".

(As an aside, I've owned and seen older steel-string and nylon-string acoustic guitars that used a single piece of solid wood for the entire top. There was a time when using one large piece of wood was cheaper than gluing together two book-matched pieces, so cheap guitars had a single, one-piece, solid wood top. Good luck finding trees big enough to yield one-piece wooden tops now!)

So yes, the IKEA RASTs I used to buy in the USA, and later Canada, were actually made from what used to be called "blockboard", which is now called "solid pine".

Apparently when the individual bits of wood become smaller than a grain of wheat, even the marketing types can no longer call it "solid pine", most likely for legal reasons. Then it becomes "chipboard" or "particle board" or "MDF" instead.

I think I've actually seen the term "solid bamboo" used for the stuff made from glued-together little chunks of bamboo, too!


-Gnobuddy
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Old 20th February 2019, 01:19 AM   #17
john65b is offline john65b  United States
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I have two guitars that have the Richlite fretboard, one of which is a Gibson Memphis. I really like how slick it is, count me in as one of the few that like it...but I read that Gibson was in a pinch having to be forced to use it - they got caught continuing to make fretboards on guitars with the now more illegal Rosewoods (CITES).New CITES Regulations For All Rosewood Species | Reverb News
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Old 20th February 2019, 05:31 AM   #18
Gnobuddy is offline Gnobuddy  Canada
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Originally Posted by john65b View Post
I have two guitars that have the Richlite fretboard
I have one Craigslist-sourced Squier 5-string bass with a fretboard made from ground-up hamburger boxes. I didn't know that's what I was getting when I bought it - but I paid less than half the new price, the bass was flawless, and it had an expensive pro setup on it. So I don't have too much to complain about.

After the fact, I'm okay with the feel of the plastic fretboard, and it doesn't seem to have any effect on the sound of the bass guitar. But I still have several concerns about it:

1) Premature wear: I can already see the plastic wearing away from contact with the metal strings in the areas between frets. It looks as though the windings on the strings are rasping away microscopic shreds of plastic as the strings move. I expect string vibrato (bass players do this too!) is one of the culprits. I've never noticed this type of visible wear on any of my guitars with wooden fretboards.

2) Thermal / humidity stability. You know how older Ovation guitars always have cracked tops, because the plastic bowl-backs don't move the same way wood does with humidity or temperature changes? Over time the plastic bowl tears the wooden top apart.

Well, I have the same concern about the plastic fretboard. Will it delaminate from the neck over time? Does it cause the neck to move more as humidity changes, because, unlike a wooden fretboard, it doesn't change dimensions with humidity?

3) Refret jobs. I'm a guitarist with minimal bass skills, and I barely play my basses, so this may not be an issue for me. But if a guitar with a plastic fretboard needs new frets, is a re-fret possible? Will the hard black plastic chip, will it melt or burn if heat is used to remove the frets?

So far we haven't even talked about those Martin guitars with the entire body made of paper sheets glued together (they call it "HPL") and the neck made of hundreds of scraps of thin wood glued together. The fake wood looks as attractive as the fake wood in a 1974 Plymouth Satellite Station Wagon, and the neck made from splinters not only looks ugly, sometimes you can feel the roughness of the individual scraps through the finish. Yuck.

To add insult to injury, the paper-and-glue Martin guitars are now being priced up near the $1000 (USD) mark: ( OMCXAE Black HPL Guitar )

I don't mean to pick on all guitar manufacturers. We're living in a world where wood doesn't grow on trees any more. Or, at least, there aren't enough trees for the demand we 7.5 billion humans place on them. So the manufacturers are frantically searching for alternatives, even if that means glued-together paper sheets, ground-up cardboard, or a pile of glued-together toothpicks. But man, what a sorry state of affairs to find ourselves in!


-Gnobuddy
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Old 20th February 2019, 05:34 PM   #19
knockbill is offline knockbill  United States
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We got snowed out of a Martin Guitar Co tour today,,, Now I'm anxious to see them make this HPL model,,, sounds like old Corvette or boat construction,,, Guess we'll never run out of resin!!!! Got a new tour date in March,, we'll see...
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Old 21st February 2019, 12:21 AM   #20
dotneck335 is offline dotneck335  United States
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Then there's the FAKE guitars from China:
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Caveat Emptor!!
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