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Guitar Amps Output Transformer specs
Guitar Amps Output Transformer specs
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Old 18th June 2018, 02:33 AM   #11
JMFahey is offline JMFahey  Argentina
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Old 18th June 2018, 08:15 AM   #12
zintolo is offline zintolo  Italy
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Diameter of all wires is shown with varnish.

The approximate dimensions of the core are 2668/1998 for Marshall 100W:
Set - 37 mm
Width of the tongue is 41 mm
Width of sides is 20 mm
Window height is 60 mm
Width of the window is 18 mm
Thickness of the plates is 0.35 - 0.5 mm, depending on the year of production.
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Old 20th June 2018, 08:27 AM   #13
engel dela pena is offline engel dela pena  Philippines
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using wolpert formula,can someone teach us how dagnall c1998 came up with 620+620 primary.............

np=E x 10^8 / 4.44 x Ac x F x B

np=no. of turns
Ac=area of the core in sq.in
4.44=constant
F=lowest frequency
B=flux density lines/sq.in or gauss x 6.45 lines/s.in
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Old 20th June 2018, 09:54 AM   #14
zintolo is offline zintolo  Italy
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We are talking about Marshall, so you have around 460 Vdc B+, that are around 400 Vpp, so 141 Vrms.
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Old 20th June 2018, 10:12 AM   #15
jazbo8 is offline jazbo8
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Guitar Amps Output Transformer specs
He's referring to the primary no. of turns, not the B+ voltage...
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Old 20th June 2018, 10:24 AM   #16
engel dela pena is offline engel dela pena  Philippines
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazbo8 View Post
He's referring to the primary no. of turns, not the B+ voltage...
right
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Old 20th June 2018, 12:49 PM   #17
zintolo is offline zintolo  Italy
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jazbo8, there are two ways of reading the messages.
One is reading the messages, the other one is reading between the lines.

I perfectly know what engel wants, but due to the book he cited, I also know that Engl already has all the other informations of the formula, except the voltage.

That's what I gave him, then it's just a matter of calculating it.
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Old 20th June 2018, 05:07 PM   #18
engel dela pena is offline engel dela pena  Philippines
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replicas playing with this data
merren 1.75K 1.5in stack
classic tone 1.7K and 2.2K @350v ct @ 290mA
sowter 1.75K 50H

metropolous plate v 498v
Calculate Tube Amp Power Transformer Current here 479v
if i knew i would not ask,all i can do is guess
even if i tried some of wolpert given figures
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Old 4th July 2018, 05:30 PM   #19
PRR is offline PRR  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by engel dela pena View Post
..teach us how dagnall c1998 came up with 620+620 primary.............

np=E x 10^8 / 4.44 x Ac x F x B

np=no. of turns
Ac=area of the core in sq.in
4.44=constant
F=lowest frequency
B=flux density lines/sq.in or gauss x 6.45 lines/s.in
Assemble known data. (Why do you expect US to do this??)

Many cores listed above are near 38mm square stack. This is 2.24 square inches.

Lowest note of guitar is nominally 82Hz. Whether we need full power at 82Hz is a musical question, not engineering.

If you have 490V supply you have say 440V peak or 880V p-p one side, which is 314V RMS one side. 630V RMS both sides.

I am NOT a transformer designer so some of this is WRONG.

As an extreme guess, iron can take 10,000 Gauss which seems to be 64,000 lines.

Bottom of fraction is 4.44 * 2.24 * 82 * 64,000 is 52,194,509

Top of fraction is 630 * 10^8 which is 63,000,000,000.

63,000,000,000 / 52,194,509 gives 1,207 turns. 1,207 is "exactly" 620+620=1,240 within the coarseness of our assumptions (82Hz, 440Vpk, 10K Gauss).
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Old 5th July 2018, 04:26 AM   #20
engel dela pena is offline engel dela pena  Philippines
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thanks prr,
copying is easy
understanding what was you are copying was the hardest part,
this helps a lot.............
If you have 490V supply you have say 440V peak or 880V p-p one side, which is 314V RMS one side. 630V RMS both sides.
thanks
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