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Solid hardwood front panel ok?
Solid hardwood front panel ok?
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Old 7th December 2019, 09:44 PM   #31
ellisaudio is offline ellisaudio  United States
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That being said gluing 2 objects together that are not compatible will cause stress on the joint enough that in time(5,10,25years)something has got to give.
Are you conveying that in ALL circumstances that a glue-joint connecting solid cross-grain lumber to solid long-grain lumber will fail in 5, 10, 25 years ?

Or, perhaps you mean something else by not compatible ?

Might you explain your statement ?
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Old 7th December 2019, 09:47 PM   #32
paul burchell is offline paul burchell  Canada
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Joe not all quartered/rift cuts are boring.
Lee Valley sells a "wood movement reference chart" for some 50 or so species a little calculation will give you expected movement for flat sawn and quartered cuts to help pick a piece.
Paduak with sun exposure will not maintain its brilliant color but turn a brownish red which is not as attractive.
There are more ways to construct a box depending on you equipment and experience
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Old 7th December 2019, 10:20 PM   #33
paul burchell is offline paul burchell  Canada
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Ellis no I am not but we have to consider a small amount of elasticity in wood glue to allow minimal movement, the longer the joint the more stress. A quality build piece is still a teenager at 25.
There is no black and white but a little gray. A 2" wide tenon or bridal joint properly fitted should grow old gracefully even draw bored for extra longevity.

Last edited by paul burchell; 7th December 2019 at 10:23 PM.
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Old 7th December 2019, 11:52 PM   #34
ellisaudio is offline ellisaudio  United States
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You are correct the joint will be under continuous stress because of the ebb&flow movement of solid wood. This will eventually cause the joint to self distruct.
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a small amount of elasticity in wood glue to allow minimal movement, the longer the joint the more stress.
Your first assertion was emphatic and absolute. Your second assertion conveys glue elasticity holding lumber during movement.

Can you explain ?

Maybe your initial thoughts were incomplete ?
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Old 8th December 2019, 04:07 AM   #35
kec is offline kec  United States
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Originally Posted by paul burchell View Post
Paduak with sun exposure will not maintain its brilliant color but turn a brownish red which is not as attractive.
Also, if you use some oil finishes you may get a brownish red color. One of my favorite finishes is Watco Natural oil followed by a paste wax (Minwax). But, since i knew this would turn the beautiful Paduak into an ugly color, I used a clear laquer finish instead - pictured in a previous post.
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Old 8th December 2019, 04:17 AM   #36
CraigSu is offline CraigSu  United States
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For woods that change drastically with sun exposure like padauk, purpleheart, redheart, there’s a simple trick to keep the color. Apply a high SPF sunscreen to the wood, let it absorb, then apply your finish of choice. It works under oil, lacquer, and acrylic topcoats.
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Old 8th December 2019, 01:08 PM   #37
ellisaudio is offline ellisaudio  United States
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Originally Posted by CraigSu View Post
For woods that change drastically with sun exposure like padauk, purpleheart, redheart, there’s a simple trick to keep the color. Apply a high SPF sunscreen to the wood, let it absorb, then apply your finish of choice. It works under oil, lacquer, and acrylic topcoats.
Yes, Yes Yes. Me Too! This was and generally still IS an almost idiot-proof way to get a great looking finish on lumber. I have sprayed and rubbed thick lacquer, but Watco is soooo much easier!

My only recommendation herein is to ensure the Watco will setup before use on actual lumber. This can be accomplished by wetting a paper towel and allowing it to fully air-dry ( do NOT enclose a watco-soaked paper towel in an air tight environment ).

The only problem I have experience with Watco is failure to setup & harden. About 20 years ago I wiped watco with steel wool and removed the excess after 15-20 minutes, then waited a day, 2 days, 3 days, then a week for the Linseed oil smell to dissipate. I might have waited 2 weeks, and the smell still was not gone. I eventually had to dissolve the watco and re-start the finishing process. This consumed about a month.

At the 3 day point I decided to wet a paper towel with the same Watco and leave the towel in the open air to dry. If the towel stiffened = GREAT ! I didn't stiffen. At this point, I knew the Watco was bad. This Watco was from a fresh/new 1 gallon container, and it just didn't harden. I added about 2 tbsp of Japan Drier to the gallon of watco - fixed !

I think Bob Flexner commented that Boiled Linseed oil really hasn't been boiled. Boiled Linseed oil is simply Linseed oil with Japan Drier added. Adding Japan Drier is necessary for Linseed oil hardening.

After this gallon, I started mixing my own Watco and I have been doing this for years. I prefer Naptha for the solvent and use a method similar to this: Make Your Own Oil/Varnish Blend - The Wood Whisperer .

I always test for hardening using a soaked paper towel then add some Japan drier if necessary.

Last edited by ellisaudio; 8th December 2019 at 01:11 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 8th December 2019, 02:30 PM   #38
paul burchell is offline paul burchell  Canada
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I blend my own finishes a lot, I don't believe every piece needs the protection of a hard varnish or lacquer. I also modify the mixture on the last coat or two, add varnish less oil or add some beeswax to a oil blend.
Building a hard shell surface I reserve for tabletops etc.
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Old Yesterday, 08:21 PM   #39
kec is offline kec  United States
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Here's some pics of the Swifty I built years ago using Padauk. The box is anigre veneer on the box (MDF). Finish is all Deft satin lacquer (spray cans).

You might be saying to yourself, why does this guy use Padauk so much? Well, I bought 10" x 3/4" x 8' piece at Rockler a long time ago
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Old Yesterday, 09:27 PM   #40
DPH is offline DPH  United States
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Originally Posted by ellisaudio View Post
Your first assertion was emphatic and absolute. Your second assertion conveys glue elasticity holding lumber during movement.

Can you explain ?

Maybe your initial thoughts were incomplete ?
In general, when someone makes a strongly worded statement, it's not absolute but something that *needs* to be well though out. So a solid wood baffle in southern California, where moisture content remains in a very tight band is going to behave wildly different to you in MN or Paul in Canada.

Similarly, narrow baffles are going to have fewer problems than wide ones. But there's enough tables and furniture out there that have self-destructed by ignoring expansion contraction forces. So it's not something that should be casually ignored.
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