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3D printed, full range monitors
3D printed, full range monitors
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Old 17th February 2019, 02:21 AM   #1
minibeardeath is offline minibeardeath  United States
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Default 3D printed, full range monitors

Here is one of my current speaker projects. Its a pair of full range, ported, PC monitors for my wife's desk. The driver is an Aurasound NS3-193-8A, and the amp will be an integrated DTA-2 from Parts Express. The enclosure is set at 3.25l and f3=48Hz using a B4 alignment.

Here are some screengrabs of the CAD and shots of the first prototype print.
Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.
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The print time was 22hrs for the main body, and the base was 6 hrs. In total each speaker uses just under 1kg of filament.

As you can see from the pics, the first attempt had some issues. The top of the enclosure stuck to the build plate, and it has some nasty banding from a wobbly lead screw. I'm currently fixing the banding, and I've switched filament brands to fix the adhesion issue.

Once I reprint the body, I'll do some frequency response measurements, and I may implement some basic EQ on the computer to smooth out the bass response
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Old 17th February 2019, 06:59 AM   #2
GASCo is offline GASCo  United States
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Sub’d! This looks promising!
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Old 17th February 2019, 03:30 PM   #3
FRFT is offline FRFT  United Kingdom
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Such a cool idea, I look forwards to seeing how it turns out!
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Old 18th February 2019, 05:24 AM   #4
minibeardeath is offline minibeardeath  United States
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Initial listening tests were enough to convince me that the 3d printed wall would be stiff enough. It looks like good sealing is going to be critical to making the port function properly.

Right now I think I'm very close to fixing my z-banding issue so hopefully next weekend I can print up the first of my final enclosures.
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Old 18th February 2019, 06:32 AM   #5
xrk971 is offline xrk971  United States
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3D printed, full range monitors
Nice work. I think you can go much thinner with the body wall and utilize bracing more. The bracing, can in fact, be a solid very porous solid fill (10% solid 90% porous or even 7% etc - experiment with small block first to get a feel) except region around driver basket and vent inlet. This solid porous fill serves as the stuffing/damping and will make the entire structure very rigid without such thick double walls. For a wall to be air tight needs minimum 3 layers, but maybe make 5 here and then low density fill like a surfboard. I think it will print faster.

Experiment with your nozzle tip temp - maybe a few degrees hotter will make the pimples go away. Bed temperature settings are important to prevent warpage on large builds.
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Old 18th February 2019, 06:56 AM   #6
ergo is offline ergo  Estonia
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Just for reference - this was my attempt of similar project with Omnes BB 3.01 fullrange driver
http://www.htguide.com/forum/showthr...l=1#post630306
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Old 20th February 2019, 05:08 AM   #7
minibeardeath is offline minibeardeath  United States
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xkr971 - Are you suggesting that I could get rid of the inner wall entirely and just put a lattice inside the full internal volume of the speaker enclosure? Cause could be awesome. It would definitely print faster, and with the right infill pattern it should be far stronger than even my current design. The only issue I forsee is that most slicers are not setup for that kind of thing. They typically require a solid shell around the whole infill, but this approach would leave infill exposed to the air. I am absolutely going to play with that this weekend to see if I can trick the slicer into making the gcode in the way that I want it.



I may have to make 2 solid bodies, one for the shell and one for the infill. Then I think I can trick the slicer into printing a lattice mesh for one body, inside the solid shell, for the other body. Alternately, I may just directly model the lattice and print at 100% wall thickness with 0% infill. The second approach would also let me better control exactly where the infill connects to the speaker body.


Ergo - I like your approach to the design, and separating the components was a good choice on that printer. In case you keeping having quality issues, here a great Print Quality Troubleshooting guide. With a Prusa you should be able to easily get 0.2mm layers with any quality filament. I would suggest Hatchbox as an awesome low cost filament. But really any filament with +/-0.03mm on the diameter tolerance is good. Most cheap filaments are +/-0.05mm which can cause weird extrusion artifacts at thin layers.



Did you put any sort of damping and/or notch filter in the final build? How did the final product sound?
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Old 20th February 2019, 06:54 AM   #8
ergo is offline ergo  Estonia
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The no inner wall and exposing the infill is a very interesting idea indeed, but I also have no idea how to pull that off yet. Would be a nice experiment for some day though as one can potentially win quite a lot in volume of speaker.

**
The final print I did with 0.2mm layer - took longer but came out very good. Very few small outer shell string issues, but overall looks great and if I'd sand and paint it it would look good.

The Omnes version is playing as is at my friends office for now. It sounds rather good and also the bass is nice. It of course lacks the lowest bass due to the size of speaker/box, but it does have a very nice balance. Also midrange sounds great especially with female vocals. Highs are a bit too directive but thats the case with most all of the small fullrange units.

I dis also a scaled up version (150% the volume) for Aplair 7 Gen3. Both me and my friend who bought the units consider that project as a fail. The Alpair has been praised for it's sound, but the Omnes all in all beats it by a large margin. Alpair also has a very nasty THD spike at 1.5kHz, so the midrange on that speaker does not sound as good at all. Also the overall balance is not pleasing when using no filter/EQ.
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File Type: jpg Alpair7_proto_S.jpg (42.7 KB, 170 views)
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Old 20th February 2019, 10:51 AM   #9
xrk971 is offline xrk971  United States
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I never made a bass reflex but a sealed rear chamber for a front loaded horn. It worked well. You can print a sacrificial inner wall that you cut out with a Dremel tool etc in order to fool the code to fill the whole thing. Or, go in an manually modify the code to not print those walls. It’s tricky but worth exploring as it really speeds things up.
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Old 23rd February 2019, 01:19 AM   #10
minibeardeath is offline minibeardeath  United States
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Here is my first test print!

Using solidworks I was able to make 2 solid bodies in a single file, with a .001mm offset between them, and then import the file into Simplify3d as 2 parts properly nested inside each other. Then I was able to assign walls to one body and infill to another body. The only item of note is that the infill body gets 0 walls, and 99% outline overlap so that it actually touches that other body. Then it was just a matter of printing. Simplify3d even add support to the sections of infill that needed it! I'm just about to start printing a final enclosure using this method. Print time should be ~20hrs, and only 650g of filament. Also, the test piece is extremely stiff even with only 10% infill, so I think i can afford to go 5-7% on the final part.
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