Go Back   Home > Forums > >
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Blogs Gallery Wiki Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

3D printed mark audio pluvia 7 build
3D printed mark audio pluvia 7 build
Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 27th August 2017, 05:27 PM   #1
timreeves is offline timreeves  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Default 3D printed mark audio pluvia 7 build

Hi guys,

I recently got a 3D printer, so I could learn more about CAD systems, and had some Pluvia 7 drivers I got off Mark at a recent hi-fi show, so it seemed rude not to have a play!

Based off the 9 litre vented design on the MA website, this first design is very much a proof of concept, I've started desigining the second iteration to have a lot more bracing as part of the actual 3d print, instead of being separate, and also having as many surfaces with complex curves as possible, to keep rigidity as high as possible.

The walls are 5mm thick in total, with 1.4mm each side of solid plastic and a core with 40% infill, I figure the combination of solid and slightly spongey will help dissipate energy better than a solid print, and be quicker and more efficient to print. The final speaker will get an internal coating of noise damping sludge and an external coating of epoxy resin that will be sanded and painted.

Anyway, onto the pics!

3D model
Click the image to open in full size.
My little printer and the first of 3 parts being printed
Click the image to open in full size.
Driver fits great!
Click the image to open in full size.
I ran low on black filament and my next roll is a slightly different shade and I had a bit of lifting on one side, but it fits and it's starting to come together!
Click the image to open in full size.
Part 3 is still being printed, but tomorrow I should have a fairly functional speaker!
  Reply With Quote
Old 27th August 2017, 05:47 PM   #2
Lohengrimas is offline Lohengrimas  Netherlands
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: 020
Interesting stuff and love your design: now there's just the question of cabinet resonances. Thanks for sharing.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th August 2017, 01:42 PM   #3
IanLenco is offline IanLenco  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
What a great idea! I once had a pair of Rogers DB101s for a second system. That had a pretty simple plastic enclosure but worked remarkably well.

Rogers Loudspeakers › db101

I suspect yours will work even better with a single full range driver, at least I hope so.
  Reply With Quote
Old 29th August 2017, 05:15 PM   #4
chrisb is offline chrisb
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: victoria BC
the possibilities are limited only by one's imagination, and the footprint / height of your printer .

next up would be to experiment with combinations of different material compositions - including some of the new "wood" and "metals"
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th August 2017, 01:47 AM   #5
hollowboy is offline hollowboy  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: 'straya
Looking good!

You seem to already have thought of everything that I might have suggested for the 2nd version.

Quote:
Originally Posted by timreeves View Post
I've started desigining the second iteration to have a lot more bracing as part of the actual 3d print, instead of being separate, and also having as many surfaces with complex curves as possible, to keep rigidity as high as possible.
Sounds good. I'm yet to try this sort of thing, so this is a bit of a guess: are complex curves hard to model? A simple grid + angled side walls might be more achievable. If you do an image search on "plastic pallets" you might see some layouts / ideas you'll want to steal. I assume the people who design those have optimised them for a good material:strength ratio.

Quote:
Originally Posted by timreeves View Post
The final speaker will get an internal coating of noise damping sludge
Sweet. Should work well in a light cabinet.

I'm impressed by how little warping there is. The pieces appear to interlock nicely. What are the indentations for - are you thinking of running long bolts right through the cabinet as braces?
__________________
This edit signature thingy is seriously hard to find
  Reply With Quote
Old 30th August 2017, 04:59 AM   #6
GM is offline GM  United States
diyAudio Member
 
GM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Chamblee, Ga.
__________________
Loud is Beautiful if it's Clean! As always though, the usual disclaimers apply to this post's contents.
  Reply With Quote
Old 18th December 2017, 08:12 PM   #7
JZatopa is offline JZatopa  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Chicago
Hey did you finish these? How did they turn out and are you releasing the STLs?
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2018, 05:34 PM   #8
timreeves is offline timreeves  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
So, my life got turned upside down for a bit towards the end of this project.

So I scrapped it, as I decided I needed more bass in my life than 4" FR drivers could provide on their own.

My new concept is, full range driver in a small, sealed enclosure (2 reasons for sealed, I prefer the transient response, and with a slightly undersize enclosure, I can make them falloff at my XO point so I can simplify my xo's)
And a 5" to 6.5" vented woofer providing everything it can to fill in the bass, f3 of under 60hz and a cabinet 7 litres or less was my goal.
I wanted to create something that both had the soundstage advantages of full range drivers, but the extension, impact and ability to be driven really hard in a compact design, like a more traditional loudspeaker. Doing some quick maths, I came up with a maximum XO point of 250Hz, which is where I quickly realised why this idea has very rarely been put into practice commercially, air coil inductors that big are shitting expensive, luckily ESR isn't that big of a deal on a high pass, and you can get away with iron core for the lowpass as it's only playing the bottom 2 octaves, still, not gonna be a cheap XO by a LONG shot, luckily I can run fully active for testing.

I started auditioning the full range drivers I had to hand, markaudio pluvia 7, some of those tangband jobbies and some hybrid audio legatia L4, the TB's were an instant write off as I could only find one, and urghhh, are we really gonna pretend anything outdoes the L4's? The MarkAudio's did put in a good performance, but the top end and staging just weren't on the same level.

Here's a pic of them in hot contention.

Click the image to open in full size.

Then onto woofer considerations, for auditioning midranges I was just using the bass drivers still in their boxes from a 150 pair of active monitor speakers, as all of my stock I had laying around was 6.5" or more, which is larger than my 3d printer can accomodate, I had to go shopping. Was finalising between some peerless, sb audio and dayton units, when I saw some gorgeous bnib 5.25" Seas ER15rly units on Ebay that I snagged for 58, sorted.

Enclosure design was based purely on how few parts I'd have to print to get something good, with just under 200mm in each dimension, and wall thickness to consider, 6 litres per print was a reasonable goal. The top half is just empty space and driver mount, the bottom half is a completely printed in place port, plus a bit of extra space. For this design it's tuned to 44hz, with a vent cross area of 52mm x 26mm and nearly 400mm long including flares! Which is pretty crazy in a tiny monitor speaker.

Here's the render of my first mock up of the midbass enclosure, a few things have changed, a few things will change still

Click the image to open in full size.

here it is with a driver in situ, first changes are going to be making the rebate go all around the driver instead of falling away at the sides with the bezel, it just doesn't look "right" at the moment and re-doing the bracing, it's a bit ****. The print also went pretty **** as I was trying to use up a roll that I'm not keen on and I had a few issues.

Click the image to open in full size.

And here's the bottom half currently being squeezed out, really happy with how this one's looking so far

Click the image to open in full size.

At around 50 hours per speaker to print, even with an oversized nozzle, this is a patient process, but it's awesome that I can get a fully built enclosure, with bracing and fancy fluted port without a spec of sawdust or a single sawn off thumb end

I do plan to get some fibreglass and CSM on the inside though to stiffen them up and add weight
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2018, 05:43 PM   #9
chrisb is offline chrisb
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: victoria BC
What types of material are you able to use in this printer, and what would the cost be for something like the Pluvia enclosures? I almost called them boxes, but that hardly applies to this type of fabrication.
__________________
like my mind, this space intentionally blank
  Reply With Quote
Old 10th February 2018, 05:57 PM   #10
timreeves is offline timreeves  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
I'm just using PLA plastic, which is very easy to print, has almost zero shrinkage and costs about $15 a kilo for the cheap stuff, which works fine.

Then I suppose you'd have to factor in electricity costs, the printer uses about 200w in normal use (300w when the build plate is heating up)

The little midrange pods have 2mm thick solid walls, 10mm front plate and I can stand on them without them deforming at all thanks to their shape. They use a bit under 200g of plastic each and take 5- 6 hours to print witha 0.6mm nozzle on my printer.

The midbass box has 3mm walls and uses a bit over a kilo of plastic for each side! This is a long *** print, my printer will be going flat out for ~100 hours for all 4 parts.

I get electric bundled in with my rent, so for me this is all very cheap.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


3D printed mark audio pluvia 7 buildHide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mark Audio Pluvia Seven Mar-Ken Sketches planet10 Planet 10 hifi 37 24th July 2018 09:29 PM
New Mark Audio Pluvia Seven IRONHAND54 Full Range 269 5th June 2018 09:46 PM
Mark Audio Alpair 7.3 or Pluvia 7 montana1 Full Range 9 22nd September 2016 01:11 AM
TS Parameters for Mark Audio Pluvia 7 or Alpair 7? Veleric Full Range 5 15th April 2016 10:50 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:31 AM.


Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 14.29%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2018 diyAudio
Wiki