Go Back   Home > Forums > >
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Blogs Gallery Wiki Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Everything Else Anything related to audio / video / electronics etc) BUT remember- we have many new forums where your thread may now fit! .... Parts, Equipment & Tools, Construction Tips, Software Tools......

How long to recognize a frequency?
How long to recognize a frequency?
Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 19th August 2019, 10:21 PM   #1
bradleypnw is offline bradleypnw
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Default How long to recognize a frequency?

How long do we need to hear a sound wave before we recognize the frequency? Is it one quarter wavelength, one half, a full cycle, or longer?
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th August 2019, 10:51 PM   #2
rayma is offline rayma  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
I seem to recall around one to several cycles.
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th August 2019, 11:36 PM   #3
kevinkr is offline kevinkr  United States
diyAudio Moderator
 
kevinkr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Boston, Massachusetts
How long to recognize a frequency?
And pretty much only for those who are trained, and even then probably not very accurate.
__________________
"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead." - Thomas Paine
  Reply With Quote
Old 19th August 2019, 11:41 PM   #4
rayma is offline rayma  United States
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
You'd need to have perfect pitch to do it, or else compare the burst with several continuous tones and pick a match.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th August 2019, 11:36 AM   #5
DF96 is offline DF96  England
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
A 'sine wave' which lasts for only a very short time does not have a frequency, but a range of frequencies. We cannot recognise what it does not have. The longer it lasts the better defined is the frequency. A few cycles would be the minimum. Learn about Fourier theory.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th August 2019, 11:41 AM   #6
scottjoplin is offline scottjoplin  Wales
diyAudio Member
 
scottjoplin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Penrhyndeudraeth
IIRC Earl Geddes suggested around 5 cycles for low frequencies, hence positioning of subs in a room is not critical in the average listening room from the perspective of time alignment.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th August 2019, 11:50 AM   #7
AllenB is offline AllenB  Australia
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
..and down to a fraction of a cycle at higher frequencies.
  Reply With Quote
Old 20th August 2019, 11:38 PM   #8
bradleypnw is offline bradleypnw
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2019
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottjoplin View Post
IIRC Earl Geddes suggested around 5 cycles for low frequencies, hence positioning of subs in a room is not critical in the average listening room from the perspective of time alignment.
Great. Geddes also said we perceive higher volume level with longer time exposure. I was thinking about building a low frequency array with each driver delayed to increase time exposure to low frequencies.

My goal is to play bass at lower physical volume levels then use increased time exposure to trick my brain into perceiving higher volume levels.
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st August 2019, 09:54 AM   #9
DF96 is offline DF96  England
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenB
..and down to a fraction of a cycle at higher frequencies.
A fraction of a cycle does not have a frequency, it has a fairly wide band.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bradleypnw
I was thinking about building a low frequency array with each driver delayed to increase time exposure to low frequencies.
You could make your room sound like a cathedral.
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st August 2019, 10:04 AM   #10
Bill Coltrane is offline Bill Coltrane  Netherlands
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradleypnw View Post
Great. Geddes also said we perceive higher volume level with longer time exposure. I was thinking about building a low frequency array with each driver delayed to increase time exposure to low frequencies.

My goal is to play bass at lower physical volume levels then use increased time exposure to trick my brain into perceiving higher volume levels.
Its way way way easier to do this experiment with a DAW (digital audio workstation). Just add a lowpassed and delayed signal to your original signal. Audacity is fine for this and free.
__________________
Subjective measurements with the proper protocol is the only thing that matters.
  Reply With Quote

Reply


How long to recognize a frequency?Hide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need HELP to recognize an IC Tolik Parts 2 20th October 2015 03:51 PM
How long is long enough to test an amp after repair? spooney Car Audio 2 31st January 2011 12:05 AM
Does someone recognize these? partner11 Multi-Way 1 6th August 2010 08:23 PM
anyone recognize this amp? damage Car Audio 22 17th January 2009 11:39 AM
Forgot to do this long long time ago chris ma Introductions 2 30th October 2003 10:53 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:01 AM.


Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 15.00%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2019 diyAudio
Wiki