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Sound has mass?....
Sound has mass?....
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Old 11th October 2019, 07:38 PM   #31
LateraLiz is offline LateraLiz  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AudioLapDance View Post
Attachment 786975

*tiss-boom-ba*
"research".
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Old 12th October 2019, 03:29 PM   #32
Fast Eddie D is offline Fast Eddie D  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhaen View Post
Maybe some of us have synaesthesia. A friend of mine relates colour to sounds and numbers.
I experienced this on LSD in the 1970s. Music made me see awesome colors. Colors made me hear sounds.

It was great! I wouldn't do it again or recommend it though.
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Old 12th October 2019, 03:35 PM   #33
Fast Eddie D is offline Fast Eddie D  United States
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Back on topic...

The mediums sound travels through have mass. Technologies exploit this.

The mass of air in a speaker cabinet or port is part of the equations used to design speaker cabinets, is it not?

Hypothetical models are interesting if they eventually help us explain stuff. I think the jury is still out on "negative gravity" etc.
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Old 12th October 2019, 05:05 PM   #34
Galu is offline Galu  Scotland
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Researchers suggest that empirical support for the 'sound has mass' hypothesis may be obtained by monitoring earthquakes.

An earthquake generates powerful sound waves which travel through the Earth's crust, and the mass associated with them may register on sensitive gravimeters.

These sound waves could have a mass as large as 100 billion kilograms associated with them!
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Old 12th October 2019, 06:08 PM   #35
Fast Eddie D is offline Fast Eddie D  United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Galu View Post
Researchers suggest that empirical support for the 'sound has mass' hypothesis may be obtained by monitoring earthquakes.

An earthquake generates powerful sound waves which travel through the Earth's crust, and the mass associated with them may register on sensitive gravimeters.

These sound waves could have a mass as large as 100 billion kilograms associated with them!

Again, the medium propagating the sound has mass. Sound by definition is the periodic oscillation of said medium.

Mass in motion possesses the property of momentum. In the case of the earth's crust, that momentum is very large. Momentum can impart a force on another object (think pool balls). In the case of earthquakes, very large forces are imparted on objects. We all know the results.

There is no sound without a medium. Sound does not propagate through space.
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Old 12th October 2019, 06:54 PM   #36
Galu is offline Galu  Scotland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fast Eddie D View Post
There is no sound without a medium. Sound does not propogate through space.
I agree - I've performed the ringing bell in the vacuum jar experiment and I've seen 'Alien' - in space no one can hear you scream!

The new, as yet unproven, theory postulates that sound waves carry a small amount of mass with them as they travel through a medium.

The mass to which the researchers refer is not related to the mass of the medium itself.

Physics - Focus: Sound Waves Carry Mass

Quote:
The traditional view of sound is that it is a wave motion which transfers energy without transporting mass from source to destination.

The new theory suggests that sound is a particle motion. The particles of sound are called phonons and they interact with a gravitational field in a way that requires them to transport mass as they move from source to destination.
P.S. I don't necessarily agree with the new 'theory'!

Last edited by Galu; 12th October 2019 at 07:15 PM.
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Old 12th October 2019, 07:21 PM   #37
Fast Eddie D is offline Fast Eddie D  United States
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I understand that this is how we find stuff out.

Treating sound as a particle may have some explanatory power. Time will tell.
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Old 12th October 2019, 07:54 PM   #38
Galu is offline Galu  Scotland
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Time will tell indeed!

For now, I'm happy to agree that sound energy is transferred via the to and fro molecular vibrations which produce a longitudinal wave!
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