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Electronic Flue Gas Analyser
Electronic Flue Gas Analyser
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Old 8th July 2017, 06:52 AM   #31
Andrew engineer is offline Andrew engineer  United Kingdom
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Greetings again. I have been occupied with other things recently.
The pump motor armature looks from the commutator end just like millions of other little permanent magnet motors, but at the other end is this delightful centrifugal governor. Thinking about the CO2 sensor indicates the importance of a constant gas flow rate, and this is presumably the reason for the governor.
The eccentric is basic and straightforward. It could have been designed with much lighter components, and would have resulted in a quieter and smoother running piece of equipment.
I use generally clock and watch oil for timepiece repairs, but use engine oil for the slowest parts of clock movements, and always for clock mainsprings. In suggesting sewing machine oil are you thinking of long life without oxidising and thickening? If it does last a lot longer then it would be worth it. But does it? (I know that 3-in-1 type household oil dries or disappears remarkably quickly, and would not use it for this kind of equipment.)
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File Type: jpg Commutatot skimmed.jpg (358.9 KB, 35 views)
File Type: jpg Governor.jpg (195.7 KB, 35 views)
File Type: jpg Motor showing eccentric.jpg (305.2 KB, 33 views)
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Old 15th July 2017, 01:24 PM   #32
Michael 5of9 is offline Michael 5of9  United Kingdom
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Location: CUMBRIA in ENGLAND
Default Maintenance: Grease and Oil Moving Parts

[QUOTE=Andrew engineer;5126298]

Quote:
pump motor armature looks from the commutator end just like millions of other little permanent magnet motors, but at the other end is this delightful centrifugal governor. The eccentric is basic and straightforward.
Yes I agree; well thought-out. The work you have undertook on the pump motor would be described more than maintenance or service; say rebuilt? In this case; consideration to clean, inspect (include resistance and current checks), adjust and a lasting grease/lubricant is of the uppermost importance, as the likelihood of this work been carried out again is likely to be slim.


Quote:
In suggesting sewing machine oil are you thinking of long life without oxidising and thickening?
We need a lubrication/oil that will be slow to dry out thus preventing warmup leading to seizure! Consideration of the type and amount as to prevent contamination to other areas must be considered!


Quote:
If it does last a lot longer then it would be worth it. But does it? (I know that 3-in-1 type household oil dries or disappears remarkably quickly, and would not use it for this kind of equipment.)
If you are undertaking user maintenance (annually); the writer says “Flue-gas pump; mechanism occasionally requires a spot of light machine oil; as directed in section 4. The pump is designed to provide a minimum suction of 125mm/Hg” a drop of oil on the end of the governor/mechanism, I would set this unit so as the drop of oil will have the chance to reach the most inner part of the moving arm.

On this occasion as the pump motor was disassembled a smear of the mentioned high temperature grease (it’s translucent) would be the optimum way to lubricate don’t you think so?

Which is preferred; well what have we on the shelf for starters that would do, I would use either sewing or clock oil.
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Old 30th November 2017, 08:19 PM   #33
Andrew engineer is offline Andrew engineer  United Kingdom
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Default potentiometer (trimmer) notes

Here is my record of the trimmers (8 in all), none of which I have adjusted. All I have done is to measure their resistances between each pair of legs, to assure myself that they are all in order (particularly conducting between the track and wiper).
While doing this I tried to assure myself that the ICs were making good contact in their sockets. If I had felt dubious I would have removed the sockets and soldered the ICs straight into the board, but they look fine at the moment.
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