Go Back   Home > Forums > >
Home Forums Rules Articles diyAudio Store Blogs Gallery Wiki Register Donations FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Construction Tips Construction techniques and tips

Tap aluminum heatsink
Tap aluminum heatsink
Please consider donating to help us continue to serve you.

Ads on/off / Custom Title / More PMs / More album space / Advanced printing & mass image saving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 6th June 2020, 09:39 AM   #1
JMF11 is offline JMF11  France
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Default Tap aluminum heatsink

Hello,



I need to tap two M3 holes in aluminum heatsinks. I have 3 pass 3mm taps.


I don't succeed to have nice threads. They finish "too big hole" and the screw slips in them.


I had the advice to use only the last finishing one, as aluminum is a rather soft metal. This is a bit better, but still not very nice.


I have difficulties to start and stay vertical...


How do you do ?


Any tips to tap heatsinks ?


JMF
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th June 2020, 09:45 AM   #2
KatieandDad is offline KatieandDad  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
KatieandDad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: UK
There are several ways to do this.

1. Tap from the rear. This results in the thread at the working surface being better formed.

2. Fit a suitable metal plate on the face of the heatsink so that the loose hole is taken up in the scrap material.

3. Use a drill press.
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th June 2020, 09:46 AM   #3
Kjeldsen is offline Kjeldsen  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Randers, Denmark
It seems you drill the hole to big. I just go very slow to begin with en make sure it's more or less straight. If you have a drill bench that can go very slow then this could be an option.
__________________
http://kjeldsensforbindelser.dk
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th June 2020, 10:08 AM   #4
JMF11 is offline JMF11  France
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Thanks for the tips.


I like the scrap metal plate idea.


How do you use a drill press to do the job? I would be afraid:
- either to press too hard
- or to break the tap ?


I drill at 2.5mm for M3, which looks like the "official" value.


JMF
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th June 2020, 10:10 AM   #5
edbarx is offline edbarx  Europe
diyAudio Member
 
edbarx's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Maltese Archipelago
Taps require a very steady and accurate hand control which is difficult to achieve with taps in the range of a few millimeters in diameter. My advice is to use a drill stand and work very slowly by manually rotating the chuck with your hand. If your holes came out to be too big, use small bolts through the heatsink.
__________________
Any fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of a genius, and a lot of courage, to move in the opposite direction. [Albert Einstein]
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th June 2020, 10:15 AM   #6
JMF11 is offline JMF11  France
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
OK, understood.


I take the opporttunity to ask if there is a better tool tu cut heatsink than a Hack Saw (I don't find that they cut thick aluminum so easily).


JMF
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th June 2020, 10:22 AM   #7
Sadface is offline Sadface  New Zealand
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
2.5mm is too large for M3

You need to use 2mm.
It took me a while to figure that one out. Once I changed to 2mm I stopped having issues with laxity.
3mm for m4

I second using a drill press

I know its not considered good practice but........
I have also had great success using a cordless drill driver for taping m3 and m4 holes. I find that the freedom from having to provide rotation allows me to focus my limited brain power on jamming the tap as hard into the hole as possible till it bites and then things are easy.
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th June 2020, 10:22 AM   #8
Kjeldsen is offline Kjeldsen  Denmark
diyAudio Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Randers, Denmark
2.5 mm is good, but also measure the final hole. It can easily be bigger. I simply don't see how the final tapped hole can be to big. I have done this a lot, and never experienced this
__________________
http://kjeldsensforbindelser.dk
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th June 2020, 10:31 AM   #9
KatieandDad is offline KatieandDad  United Kingdom
diyAudio Member
 
KatieandDad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: UK
2.5mm is the correct drill for an M3 tap.

If you use a smaller drill you run the risk of snapping the tap.

Last edited by KatieandDad; 6th June 2020 at 10:40 AM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 6th June 2020, 10:35 AM   #10
coolnose is offline coolnose  Europe
diyAudio Member
 
coolnose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Stupid question, but I suppose your are lubricating as needed and turn the tap back half a turn out every 1 or 1 1/2 turn ?
  Reply With Quote

Reply


Tap aluminum heatsinkHide this!Advertise here!
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
CNC custom aluminum plate, case, heatsink, front plate SunnyCNC engineering Vendor's Bazaar 0 16th September 2017 02:27 AM
Attaching Aluminum bar to heatsink - thermal paste or pads? john65b Solid State 52 3rd January 2015 09:43 AM
Aluminum Heatsink, approx 10" x 5" x 3" orthoefer Swap Meet 2 7th August 2013 08:04 PM
Aluminum lid for a Radioshack Project Enclosure as a heatsink for an LM3886? haziz Chip Amps 1 6th April 2009 03:08 PM
Copper/Aluminum heatsink - yay or nay? thylantyr Solid State 36 1st July 2004 11:11 PM


New To Site? Need Help?

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:15 AM.


Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 14.29%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1999-2020 diyAudio
Wiki