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Class D Switching Power Amplifiers and Power D/A conversion

IR4301
IR4301
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Old 25th June 2020, 03:00 PM   #1
kipman725 is offline kipman725  United Kingdom
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Default IR4301

This module is marketed as super efficient (even at lower output powers) not requiring a heat sink for 100W output. Whats interesting for me is that the operating voltage is high (80V abs max) and the thermal resistance to the case isn't that high (4C/W). I'm thinking with a bit of heatsinking and a multilayer board with thermal vias for real world signal crest factors in excess of 6dB this amplifier could be bridged into 4 ohms loads and not overheat.

This is an app note where a small heatsink is applied and continuous ratings of 130W achieved and also peak power up to 220W with a heatsink:
https://www.infineon.com/dgdl/irauda...535697359c2bdd

I guess what would stop this working would be if the chip started to limit output current and/or some other mechanism caused high distortion. The datasheet does have an over current protection block shown in the block diagram which is set to 16A limiting peak power to ~500W.

Seems to be a lot of advantages for the usual TI parts and I can't find any DIY discussion.

Anyway thoughts?
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Old 29th June 2020, 12:28 PM   #2
Baldin is offline Baldin  Denmark
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Hi Kipman725

I have designed a PCB for IR4302 (dual channel ... otherwise same as IR4301), but have not yet got them produced as I have other projects in the making.

I think what puts most people off is the difficulties in soldering these chips .... not really straight forward.
Secondly, it is still only 80V, so only good up to some +100W really. But at that level they are also a really good option.
I'm working on a AD1701 board as well, so thinking of making a 5x10cm board with a AD1701 and a IR4302 to form a small "plate amp" option for small 2 ways.

If you want higher power you should for sure go for a IRS2092 implementation. It's the same controlling part as in the IR430x but you have a possibility to go to max +-100Vdc .... so if we are talking 500W this is the way to go. I have worked with these chips for a long time and with only good results. You can make a better/different fb topology than what is presented in all the App notes. I use a dual bf option with both pre and post filter fb.

As for cooling of IR430x, you should cool them from the underside of the board, not on top of the chip package. You need to use 2 layer PCB and use a number of vias to connect the hot pads on the top side with the back side of the PCB. Place a small heat sink on top of that.

In my experience, the output coil will in many cases get hotter than the chip/output fets.
This is somewhat determined by the sw freq (higher is better), core size, DC voltage and wire thickness.

/Baldin
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Old 29th June 2020, 01:41 PM   #3
kipman725 is offline kipman725  United Kingdom
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An external switch class-D would be better in many ways but it would not be as small and achieving the very high efficiency of the IR parts at low output power would be tricky. The 500W projection was based on 4ohms and running two chips per channel bridged to get double the voltage swing with the constraint of not triggering the over current protect. My interest is for my battery powered system where I'm using 3*: TPA3251-2CH-140W | 3e Audio
at the moment as a proof of concept using a buck converter from a 16S lithium ion battery (upto 67.2V). I would like to integrate everything onto a single board (DSP+AMPS) like you. With the TPA3251 ICs the board space required per IC is pretty huge and I need that additional buck converter. Getting heat out of the base of the IC is no problem I can do a much better job than the application note using a 0.8mm thick PCB and thermal vias. Beyond the 16A over current protect and the difficulty getting the heat out of a small package I can't see any issue? I guess a prototype is in order...
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Old 29th June 2020, 03:07 PM   #4
Erica.C is offline Erica.C  China
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Actually, this chip is not so efficient as it mentioned in the application note. It do need the heatsink with high power output.
I make some boards with this chip, with dual 32V supply, it can get 120W @ 1% THD with 4 OHM load if you dissipate its heat well.(I use the SMD stud and burnt TO-220 transistor as the heatsink)
I'll show some pictures as below.
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Old 29th June 2020, 04:31 PM   #5
kipman725 is offline kipman725  United Kingdom
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Erica.C the IC is on the top layer? if so I think significant reductions in thermal resistance from the junction can be made. Did your board do 120W continuous with the pictured heat-sink?

Here is a load of testing data on a bottom side package:
https://gansystems.com/wp-content/up...ode-031815.pdf
the thermal vias are the largest contribution to the thermal resistance so covering a larger area than the package and using a thinner board can make a big difference.
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Old 29th June 2020, 11:54 PM   #6
Mark Tillotson is offline Mark Tillotson
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IR have a reputation for over-inflated ratings in their datasheets IMO, I've seen TO220 MOSFETs they rate at 100's of amps for instance, which is marketing tosh - in a foot-note somewhere they admit this is the "die limit" (probably in liquid nitrogen!)

This is a 5x6mm chip with 30 and 39 milliohm FETs, do the calculations and you'll see it needs to be mounted on 2oz IMS PCB for realistic thermal management - if you want to run at continuous high powers use discrete FETs with good heatsinking possibilities, or use an IMS breakout for this chip.

This device allows good headroom at lower powers of course.
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Old 30th June 2020, 09:29 AM   #7
kipman725 is offline kipman725  United Kingdom
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Using aluminum PCB inserts into a normal PCB seems like a good idea for this part. This is a process I have seen used where an internal cut out is made in the FR4 board for a small alu board holding the power devce and copper tape soldered over the gap between the boards. I had a quick look at ALLPCB and 10 30*30mm ALU boards are between $8 and $17. 39m ohm doesn't seem bad to me, that's only 10W of conduction loss at 16A.
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Old 30th June 2020, 01:57 PM   #8
bucks bunny is offline bucks bunny  Germany
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RDSon is about half the value compared to TI TPA325x. Besides this the split supply and the DIY-unfriendly case make these chips not attractive for me. I prefer a single supply full bridge as preferrable topology for battery operation and for the lack of bus pumping as well.
Just my 2c.
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Old 30th June 2020, 02:45 PM   #9
Erica.C is offline Erica.C  China
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kipman725 View Post
Erica.C the IC is on the top layer? if so I think significant reductions in thermal resistance from the junction can be made. Did your board do 120W continuous with the pictured heat-sink?

Here is a load of testing data on a bottom side package:
https://gansystems.com/wp-content/up...ode-031815.pdf
the thermal vias are the largest contribution to the thermal resistance so covering a larger area than the package and using a thinner board can make a big difference.
Yes, the AMP IC is on the top side, and some Vias connect with the VS pad, then the bottom side SMD stud is connect with these vias to dissipate its heat, with this stud on my board, i can get near 30W continuous power output with 4ohm load under open area. i think this is enough in reality.
 

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