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My version of an Ultrasonic Record Cleaner
My version of an Ultrasonic Record Cleaner
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Old 11th January 2017, 06:27 PM   #1561
bbftx is offline bbftx  United States
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Location: Austin, TX
HA, you really need 30cm tank length at a minimum. The Sonix ST-136 sneaks in at 11.5" (29.2cm) and works. This means a minimum 6L machine in almost all cases.
Cheers,
B B
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Old 11th January 2017, 07:58 PM   #1562
Packgrog is offline Packgrog  United States
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Originally Posted by bbftx View Post
It's not surprising the VPI group was promoting a follow-up cleaning with a vacuum RCM. VPI makes vacuum RCMs, so they want to try to avoid becoming obsolete!

I have a VPI, and I don't notice any additional benefit from using it after ultrasonic cleaning.
Cheers
B B
FWIW, I noticed the benefit of separate cleaning with vacuuming based on my own experiences, before joining the VPI thread. And long before owning anything from VPI.
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Old 14th January 2017, 10:17 PM   #1563
elinter is offline elinter  United States
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Well the old adage "you get what you pay for" is proven again. Recall a few weeks ago I posted about not having great results using a cheap Chinese-made ULC I bought on ebay. Despite making lots of noise, sounding like it was working, I was always disappointed in the results. There was still visible grime on the vinyl, even after a full 60 minute cleaning.

I splurged for Christmas and bough an Elma P60H and the results have been nothing less than incredible. Very noticeable difference in the cleaning thoroughness compared to the cheaper version.

Now I have a new challenge – the scum floating at the top of the tank is clinging to the records when I pull them out. Anyone else have that problem and found a solution?
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Old 16th January 2017, 06:05 PM   #1564
bbftx is offline bbftx  United States
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Originally Posted by elinter View Post
Well the old adage "you get what you pay for" is proven again. Recall a few weeks ago I posted about not having great results using a cheap Chinese-made ULC I bought on ebay. Despite making lots of noise, sounding like it was working, I was always disappointed in the results. There was still visible grime on the vinyl, even after a full 60 minute cleaning.

I splurged for Christmas and bough an Elma P60H and the results have been nothing less than incredible. Very noticeable difference in the cleaning thoroughness compared to the cheaper version.

Now I have a new challenge – the scum floating at the top of the tank is clinging to the records when I pull them out. Anyone else have that problem and found a solution?
E, thanks for the update on the cheap Ultrasonic cleaner. As I've said before in this thread, this is not a surprise when it happens. "Lots of noise" is not a good sign from a USC. The higher quality machines, particularly if they are working at a higher frequency, make a lot less noise that is also less irritating in nature.

Regarding "floaters", you have a couple of options. I use the return tubing from my filtering system to rinse off any floaters if I have them as I remove the LPs from the tank. You could also just use a squeeze bottle with your choice of clean water to accomplish this task. After the LPs are removed, I use a fine mesh aquarium net to round up the floaters ---- $1.89 at your nearest pet store....

Another added option is to adapt a skimmer filter system to your tank, hanging off the side, although this might reduce your record cleaning capacity per load in a 6L tank that is already tight for space if you are trying to clean multiple records at a time. I have not felt the need to mount a skimmer, but if I was starting over, I'd probably go with a 10 liter tank that would allow me room to do this on the end of the tank.
Best
B B

Last edited by bbftx; 16th January 2017 at 06:21 PM.
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Old 17th January 2017, 10:58 AM   #1565
sliceofhogan is offline sliceofhogan  Netherlands
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I made this one....

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Works - still figuring out the optimum nr of albums/distance between the albums for the "perfect" wash
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Old 18th January 2017, 10:26 AM   #1566
PhantomZone is offline PhantomZone
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I'm ready to buy a decent cleaner but am having problems finding something in Europe (preferably Germany)

I've opted for the VinylStack kit and would like to get a decent 60 or 80KHz machine but Elma units are 1250 and Sonix IV machines don't seem easy to get...

The Vibrato unit looks good but they're had none in stock for 6 weeks...

Any Europeans have a recommendation?
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Old 18th January 2017, 07:45 PM   #1567
popmarter is offline popmarter  Netherlands
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Originally Posted by PhantomZone View Post
I'm ready to buy a decent cleaner but am having problems finding something in Europe (preferably Germany)

I've opted for the VinylStack kit and would like to get a decent 60 or 80KHz machine but Elma units are 1250 and Sonix IV machines don't seem easy to get...

The Vibrato unit looks good but they're had none in stock for 6 weeks...

Any Europeans have a recommendation?
Ask this guy, he offered some demo-units while ago. I bought one and it works great. emmi-ultraschall-welt on eBay
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Old 18th January 2017, 09:22 PM   #1568
andyr is offline andyr  Australia
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Originally Posted by sliceofhogan View Post

Works - still figuring out the optimum nr of albums/distance between the albums for the "perfect" wash
My understanding is that you need an 1" between LPs (and from the outside LPs to the side of the tank) if your US frequency is 60Khz ... and 1 1/2" if you have a 40Khz machine.

Andy
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Old 19th January 2017, 10:58 AM   #1569
PhantomZone is offline PhantomZone
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Originally Posted by popmarter View Post
Ask this guy, he offered some demo-units while ago. I bought one and it works great. emmi-ultraschall-welt on eBay
Cheers...got in touch but he only sells 40KHz units...I think I'd prefer a 60 or 80!
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Old 19th January 2017, 06:00 PM   #1570
niffy is offline niffy  England
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Hi all,

I've been floating around this thread for a while and have finally made the major components for my record cleaning machine. I definitely did not have the budget for a 60 or 80khz machine and had to settle for a 40khz unit. I have a 9ltr cleaner from GT Sonic. I decided to go for the larger capacity tank so that I could space the records greater than one wavelength apart and still fit three in the cleaner.

The record spacer/label protectors are made of 6mm acrylic discs with 20mm thick hubs. Luckily I had quite a lot of acrylic left over from building my record deck. The labels are protected with discs of 1mm thick neoprene closed cell foam. This setup spaces the records 54mm apart which should be ideal for a 40khz machine.

The axle is 1/4" stainless steel with 4mm pins at either end that sit into nylon pillow blocks that take the entire weight of the axle and records. The drive is applied via a gear attached to one end of the axle. The records are really easy to mount to the axle and are secured with a wing bolt. The axle with records fitted drops in and out of the pillow blocks dead easy.

The motor is 12volt dc worm drive rated at 0.6rpm (one revolution every 100seconds) which is about 6 times faster than recommend. As water is involved using low voltage dc has a definite safety advantage. The drive gears from the motor to axle give a 8:3 reduction decreasing rotational speed and increasing torque. To further reduce speed the motor is driven by a pulse width modulation motor controller (1.50 from eBay). This allows me to select any speed from 4 1/2 minutes to 15 minutes per revolution. I've marked the position that gives 1 revolution every ten minutes. A separate switch allows easy start/stop. The motor and controller sit in a sealed acrylic box that hangs off the back of the cleaner.

The framework that supports the motor and all the other components sits on top of the cleaner and is also made of acrylic.

So far I have only done a quick test. I have a junk record that I use for cartridge alignment. As my arm is linear tracking it has a line scored on one side that makes alignment dead easy. This record doesn't live in a sleeve and hasn't been handled with care. It was filthy and covered in finger prints. I gave the unscored side a quick listen. The snap, crackle and pop almost drowned out the music. Ten minutes in the cleaner filled with plain tap water and a drop of dish soap. The difference was really quite dramatic. There is still a bit of pops but this is probably mainly due to scratches, as I said this record has been abused severely. The record was quite listenable, the level of surface noise was too low to be detracting. The real ear opener was in the run out groove. The fluid level in the tank was a bit lower than ideal and only covered half way up the run out groove. The stylus started the run out in near silence then hit the point where the water surface had been, the crackling was almost deafening in comparison. I have high hopes for proper cleaning with a proper cleaning solution.

I still have to make the components for the rinse and drying cycles. I don't see the point in making a batch of proper cleaning solution and cleaning a bunch of records until then. No point in half cleaning the records then having to clean them again.

I've actually made 4 axles. The extra work to do so was minimal once I was set up to make the first one. This way I can have one in an enzyme presoak (if necessary for really grubby records), one in the US cleaner, one in a distilled water rinse, and one in a dryer. This will allow me to run a production line style of cleaning maximizing the number of records cleaned in a session.

Here are some photos of the work so far.

Attachment 593207

Attachment 593208

Attachment 593209

Attachment 593210

Attachment 593211

Niffy
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