Why do so many designs have midrange fase reversed ?

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Yes, all normal filters have phase shift, electronic, passive, active digital, analog, acoustical. There are ways with DSP to flatten the phase, and that has become something of a new approach or a fad. But most filters you'll encounter will have phase shift.

If you have a copy of MicroSoft Excel I highly recommend "Passive Crossover Designer" by Jeff Bagby. Spending time with PCD will teach you a lot about how filter work.
 
i do prefer the mids reversed , they sound less forward easyer on the ear.

Having a mid (or any driver) with opposite polarity is completely dependent on the specific speaker/crossover design. You cant just randomly flip the polarity :confused:

Anyhow, it was an interesting observation regarding absolute phase.

Assuming that absolute phase is not audible, then
Woof(+) Mid(-) Tweet(+) is equal to
Woof(-) Mid(+) Tweet(-)

But often/usually/ime Woof(+) sounds better/louder than Woof(-).

In many 3-way cases, the midrange driver is too sensitive and cannot easily be padded down like tweeter to match the woofer insensitivity. This brings harsh or too forward sound so Mid(-) might be preferable than Mid(+) (may be audible only to batman :shhh:)

But if the design requires the same polarity between woofer and midrange (for example Woof+/Mid+/Tweet- or Woof-/Mid-/Tweet+), may be I will prefer to prioritize the woofer to have the favorable phase.
 
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