Which SpeakON?

erozsolt

Member
2004-10-14 11:57 pm
Hi,

I'd like to start using SpeakON speaker connections in my amp build. Very simple copper speaker wires, 2 wires per speaker, 11 AWG.

Where I'm puzzled are the different SpeakON sockets. Neutrik has like 40 of them:
https://www.neutrik.com/en/neutrik/...speaker-connectors/speakon-chassis-connectors

What speaker wire to SpeakON connection would you recommend? I'd have a normal aluminium case either a Modushop Mini Dissipante or a Chinese one from eBay.

Should I buy one with 3/16" flat tabs, like NL2MD?
NL2MP | Neutrik

Then I'd need to buy some quality quick disconnects like Neutrik Faston + a crimp tool to match them. (I'd probably need to buy these for IEC mains wiring anyway.)
NLFASTON | Neutrik

Alternatively I found some 4 pole mounts with screw termination. Is says "This chassis connector is not airtight.". What does this mean?
NL4MP-ST | Neutrik

Which one would you recommend?
 

kipman725

Member
Paid Member
2007-06-10 12:41 pm
Warrington
You should buy the 4 pole versions as they are much more commonly used. This is because the 2 pole connector will mate with the 4 pole socket but not the other way round.

If a Speakon is to be used on a loudspeaker it must be air tight whereas for an amp this does not matter. I usually solder directly to the tabs rather than using crimps, although this could be neater.
 

erozsolt

Member
2004-10-14 11:57 pm
What is the combo version and what is "testing jacks for interconnecting"?

All I'm looking for is a reliable connection between my DIY amp and my passive speakers.

Do you know what is used by Benchmark on the AHB2?

[IMGDEAD]https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0321/7609/products/AHB2_Rear_Angle_2000x.JPG?v=1548181149[/IMGDEAD]
 
Note the tabs are close together and you'll definitely need insulated crimps on the wiring to prevent them touching.


There are some decisions to be made as to which pinout to use - with 4-pole you can split to the two speakers, or daisy-chain them having one speaker wired to left, one to right, or you
can biamp and use two connectors on the amp. For 3- or 4-way active crossover there are 8-pin SpeakOns.


Perhaps the least confusing arrangement is to use 2 connectors on the amp, and 1+ and 1- only.


Electronics 2000 | Pin-outs | Speakon Connectors
 

erozsolt

Member
2004-10-14 11:57 pm
Thanks for the link, I'll go with this scheme:

'Standard' PA Loudspeaker:
Amplifier: One 4-pole chassis connector per channel (normally one left, one right), each wired with pins 1+ & 1-.
Cabling: 2-conductor cable with 2-pole or 4-pole plug, wired 1+ & 1- at both ends.
Speakers: One 4-pole chassis connector. Pin 1+ wired to speaker +ve, Pins 1- & 2+ wired to speaker -ve. The 2+ connection also allows the use of the bridged mono wiring scheme, see below. Often a second chassis connector is wired in parallel to allow speakers to be daisy-chained.

The only problems I still have is the Faston crimps vs screw terminated version. As I understand a high quality crimping connection "cold weld" is air tight and is not prone to oxidation between the cable and the connector. But can you make a high quality crimping connection with some cheap $30 crimping tool, or this is only possible with those $200+ tools? Also, how good is it at the Faston <> SpeakON tab connection?

Also, with something like the NLFASTON, how do you make it insulated? By cutting an adequate sized heat shrink and putting it after crimping?
680-nlfaston.jpg


My biggest reason for going with a screw terminated NL4MP-ST is that the amp module is screw terminated and the SpeakON cable connector is screw terminated as well, so I don't see any reason to make one of those 3 connections crimped.

Soldering is not an option, as I'd like to make these easy to change, prototype, etc.
 

kipman725

Member
Paid Member
2007-06-10 12:41 pm
Warrington
soldering NL4MP is quite easy and reliable, just strip only the length of the tab from the end of the wire, tin the wire and tab, hold the NL4MP in helping hands and apply heat while pressing them together. In a commercial application its worth going with crimps for speed and repeatability but for home use soldering is sufficient.